Existing Programs – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:59:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Existing Programs – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 Annual Disabled People’s Summer Carnival a Success – Union County https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/annual-disabled-peoples-summer-carnival-a-success-union-county/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:59:36 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/annual-disabled-peoples-summer-carnival-a-success-union-county/ On June 18, 2022, the Union County Department of Social Services, Office of Persons with Disabilities and Special Needs (OPDSN) held their annual Summer Carnival at Oak Ridge Park in Clark. “The annual Summer Carnival provided a fun and inclusive environment for individuals and families of all ages and abilities,” said Commissioner President Rebecca Williams. […]]]>

On June 18, 2022, the Union County Department of Social Services, Office of Persons with Disabilities and Special Needs (OPDSN) held their annual Summer Carnival at Oak Ridge Park in Clark.

“The annual Summer Carnival provided a fun and inclusive environment for individuals and families of all ages and abilities,” said Commissioner President Rebecca Williams. “We were delighted to see around 100 participants enjoying carnival games, inflatable rides, a balloon artist, a juggler and a magician.

The Office for People with Disabilities and Special Needs is the first such office in New Jersey. It was established in 2018 as part of Commissioner Sergio Granados’ Moving Union County Forward President’s 2018 Initiatives for Individual Empowerment, Education, Diversity and Inclusion.

“Union County is committed to creating more opportunities for friends, neighbors and families of all ages,” Commissioner Sergio Granados said. “The Office for People with Disabilities and Special Needs builds on our existing programs with activities and events that include more residents in meaningful social experiences, helping us forge more connections with community partners and residents. .

In addition to the aforementioned activities for those who attended the Summer Carnival, Trailside Nature & Science Center and Kaleidoscope ABA Therapy Services also provided giveaways and brochures about their services. Carnival treats such as popcorn, hot pretzels, Italian gelato and ice cream were available to attendees.

For more details on any program offered by the Office for Persons with Disabilities and Special Needs, visit online at https://ucnj.org/dhs/office-for-persons-with-disabilities-and-special-needs/ or contact the Program Coordinator, Jasmine Doughty-Whitous at Jwhitous@ucnj.org or call 908-527-4781.

For more information and updates on all Union County services during the COVID-19 outbreak, including free vaccination, free testing, emergency food distribution, and other services support, visit ucnj.org/covid19. General information about COVID-19 is available from the New Jersey Department of Health at nj.gov/health.

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New program aims to teach high school students how to respond to an opioid overdose https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-program-aims-to-teach-high-school-students-how-to-respond-to-an-opioid-overdose/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-program-aims-to-teach-high-school-students-how-to-respond-to-an-opioid-overdose/ Conversations about drinking were common at Alexandra Ewanyshyn High School in Calgary. They had guest speakers, open dialogues and received advice such as “drink lots of water”, “make sure to eat dinner”, “don’t get behind the wheel of a car”. Now a student at the University of Calgary, Ewanyshyn looks back on those days and […]]]>

Conversations about drinking were common at Alexandra Ewanyshyn High School in Calgary.

They had guest speakers, open dialogues and received advice such as “drink lots of water”, “make sure to eat dinner”, “don’t get behind the wheel of a car”.

Now a student at the University of Calgary, Ewanyshyn looks back on those days and wonders if similar conversations about opioids and drug use might have helped her friend Liam, who she says died after an overdose in 2019.

“His passing was something that I felt very unprepared to understand,” she said.

“I really had no knowledge in high school about substance use…and what addiction looks like, especially in young people or in any of my peers.”

Because of his experience, Ewanyshyn supports the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation’s efforts to add more drug use education to Canadian high schools.

The organization already offers CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) training in more than 1,800 high schools across the country.

Today, the ACT Foundation launched a new program – “Opioid Overdose Response Training” – which it hopes to offer to complement its existing training and roll out in the fall.

The training is first given to the teachers, the idea being that they pass on the knowledge to their students. He will explain what opioids are, how to recognize the signs of an overdose, and how to use nasal naloxone, a drug that temporarily reverses the effects of opioid poisoning or overdose.

The ACT Foundation has already implemented a pilot program in four Ottawa high schools.

ACT Foundation executive director Sandra Clarke said she is offering the program to high schools across Canada following a successful pilot program in Ottawa. (Chris Ensing/CBC)

“The majority of students said that after learning to use the naloxone nasal spray, they felt they could use it in an emergency if it was available,” said the ACT Foundation’s executive director. , Sandra Clarke, in an interview on Alberta at noon.

“Training in the use of the naloxone spray just adds another vital skill…so it’s really about empowerment.”

So far, neither the Calgary Board of Education (CBE) nor the Calgary Catholic School District (CCSD) have registered to receive the free training.

A CBE representative said he was looking forward to discussing the program with the ACT Foundation. Another CCSD member said future health and safety programs could include opioid training.

To fill the void, Ewanyshyn and two of her peers have already launched their own platform called The Liam Project – a social media-based initiative created in memory of their friend.

It aims to de-stigmatize substance use and encourage safer practices, focusing its messages on young adults.

“Learning more about harm reduction was a way of dealing with my grief and trying to understand it better, which translated into a desire to make positive changes,” Ewanyshyn said.

“The uncomfortable truth is that teenagers use drugs…but because of stigma and shame, they may hide their use and thus increase their levels of harm.”

Overdoses and deaths are on the rise

Alberta alone reported 1,758 fatal drug overdoses last year.

Young Canadians aged 15 to 24 are the fastest growing population requiring hospital care due to opioid overdoses.

From January to August 2021, 6,447 overdoses were reversed by naloxone kits, according to Alberta Health. (Natalie Valleau/CBC)

Patrick Black has used naloxone hundreds of times in an attempt to reverse overdoses. He is a nurse and overdose prevention lead with Boyle Street Community Services, which supports people experiencing homelessness and poverty in Alberta.

“What we see in a lot of substances these days, very small amounts can cause an overdose quite quickly,” he said.

Black added that the timing couldn’t be better to provide opioid overdose response training to high school students, so young people are prepared for an emergency.

“It’s just about preparing young adults for the real world and trying to make them as good as they can be in real-life situations,” he said.

Alberta at noon52:40Naloxone kits and teenagers

Should high school students be trained in the use of naloxone?

And for parents who might think wearing naloxone enables drug use, Black said, in his experience, it doesn’t work that way.

“Honestly, I’ve never met a single person who thought it would be a good idea to start using substances just because there’s a naloxone kit lying around.”

Accessing naloxone

According to Dr. Bonnie Larson, a family doctor in Calgary who leads a group called Street CCRED, which works to reduce the stigma of addiction, one of the barriers to using the kits may be access to them.

Although the province offers free injectable naloxone kits at some pharmacies and community sites, the nasal spray is not widely available. This is the version that the ACT Foundation will show how to use in their training.

If students want to keep injectable kits with them, pharmacies will provide basic on-site training, Dr. Larson said.

“It’s actually a little intimidating for people who’ve never handled a needle or syringe before, but it’s not complicated.”

The good news is that giving naloxone to someone who doesn’t overdose won’t hurt them, she said.

Naloxone kits are available at some pharmacies and community sites in Alberta. (Mike McArthur/CBC)

Overall, Dr. Larson is a fan of the training and wants to see it added to high school programming immediately. She hopes it will include the views of people with lived experience.

“There are thousands of people around who can tell their stories of having had a drug poisoning event and what it was like for them,” she said.

“We are all unfortunately going to have to do more than before to care for and protect each other.”

Ewanshyn is doing his part by protecting his peers through his advocacy.

She hopes these kinds of conversations will be normalized, so that in the future, young people will be better prepared to act in an emergency or even just talk with a friend.

“I think it would have also helped me understand how I could have been more supportive or understanding just by discussing drugs.”

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Northborough celebrates new Be Well initiative https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/northborough-celebrates-new-be-well-initiative/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:56:57 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/northborough-celebrates-new-be-well-initiative/ Children try to dodge the swinging red ball in one of the many bouncing house games at Wednesday’s Be Well Northborough launch event. . (Photo/Laura Hayes) NORTHBOROUGH — Families and community members packed Northborough’s Ellsworth McAfee Park to play on bouncy houses and learn about city services on Wednesday. This marked the official launch of […]]]>

Children try to dodge the swinging red ball in one of the many bouncing house games at Wednesday’s Be Well Northborough launch event. . (Photo/Laura Hayes)

NORTHBOROUGH — Families and community members packed Northborough’s Ellsworth McAfee Park to play on bouncy houses and learn about city services on Wednesday.

This marked the official launch of a new municipal initiative called Be Well Northborough.

“If you think of small town America, that’s exactly what I’m thinking of,” recreation director Allie Lane said of the event. ” It’s a way [for the departments] to communicate and educate and bring kids and families out and introduce ourselves and allow them to have a good time.

The program relies on funding from ARPA

This initiative was presented to the Northborough Board of Selectmen earlier this year.

A few months later, the elected vote to allocate $100,000 of its American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds to the program, which aims to streamline communication and scheduling between city officials and departments.

Health worker Kristin Black described the effort as an interdepartmental project to help the community recover from COVID-19.

Black and Lane are two of the town officials who are members of the Be Well Northborough task force.

The group also includes staff from Police and Fire Services, Northborough Family and Youth Services, Aging Centre, Council on Aging, Northborough Free Library and School Services, as well as Deputy City Administrator Becca Meekins.

Key facets of the group’s work include connecting community members with mental health and recovery resources – such as substance use prevention – and exploring socializing and bonding opportunities. .

“‘Get active again in your community’ is really the goal of the program,” Black said.

The working group collaborates

Black said the task force met frequently and discussed the various initiatives the departments were working on. Discussions are also looking at ways to consolidate work under one roof.

As an example, Black noted that the health department, schools, senior center, and family and youth services all provide mental health resources.

“But we’ve never really sat together in the same room and said, ‘How can we do this holistically and really make sure that we’re efficient with our resources and that we support each other and that we let’s complement our efforts,” Black said.

Some members of the Be Well working group having children in school, they noted that the children were struggling and wondered if they could participate in a fun event to mark the start of summer.

Participate in this week’s launch event.

“It was the idea to organize this event where everyone was welcome. They will meet their friends. No one was left out,” Black said.

Additionally, Black said it could introduce attendees to new things to do in town.

The health worker notes the opportunity to reconnect

Other city departments and local organizations had booths and activities at Wednesday’s event.

The fire department had CPR training dummies.

The recreation department handed out bags of popcorn, and Wegmans sponsored the event by providing fresh fruit and healthy snacks.

“I’m thrilled to see families and allow people to reconnect with their neighbors in a way that we haven’t had opportunities. [to do] over the past two years,” Black said.

“We try to think creatively”

In the meantime, Be Well Northborough has a calendar full of other activities.

These include hikes led by Ken Bennet and Forest Lyford.

Jean Rogers hosted outdoor yoga sessions at Ellsworth McAfee Park.

At the Senior Center, a class is scheduled to teach self-help techniques called Mindful Living during Uncertain Times.

Black said the city hopes to stretch ARPA funds, expand existing programs, or offer free programs. She said Be Well hopes to bring in licensed clinicians to run support groups for different age groups.

“We try to think creatively and outside the box and really engage with all residents — new in town, always in town — and realize that so many of our departments have so much to offer,” Black said.

For more information, visit https://www.town.northborough.ma.us/bewell.

Drone photography shows attendees kicking off Be Well Northborough at Ellsworth McAfee Park. (Photo/courtesy David Parenti)

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The Be Well Northborough launch event is scheduled for June 22

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A better procurement process for the modernization of the nuclear triad https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/a-better-procurement-process-for-the-modernization-of-the-nuclear-triad/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:02:44 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/a-better-procurement-process-for-the-modernization-of-the-nuclear-triad/ Air Force Chief: A Better Acquisition Process for Modernizing the Nuclear Triad Concept art by Nothrop Grumman How the Air Force approaches its new stealth bomber and ballistic missile programs will help avoid cost overruns and schedule delays that have traditionally delayed the development of other systems, the chief of staff said. service staff on […]]]>

Air Force Chief: A Better Acquisition Process for Modernizing the Nuclear Triad

Concept art by Nothrop Grumman

How the Air Force approaches its new stealth bomber and ballistic missile programs will help avoid cost overruns and schedule delays that have traditionally delayed the development of other systems, the chief of staff said. service staff on June 22.

The Air Force developed the B-21 to replace its aging fleet of B-1 and B-2 bombers, while the Sentinel would replace the LGM-30 Minuteman III. These programs constitute the two legs of the nuclear triad that the Pentagon is trying to modernize.

“Our approach with these different programs is different from how we’ve implemented other programs,” said Gen. Charles “CQ” Brown Jr., when asked about the programs at a Hudson Institute event. .

Brown said a shift in Air Force strategy is the close collaboration of acquisition professionals and Air Force operators. Acquisition experts can help operators get to “a certain level of reality” to get capability into the hands of warfighters faster, he said.

“If you just look at the issues over the years, what happens is we have another good idea. We keep adding these good ideas, which leads to cost and schedule issues” , he said at the event.

Digital engineering will also help keep programs on track, he said. Having a digital process allows for better dialogue between operators and technology developers to resolve issues before they reach the production stage. He noted that designers can continue to add new ideas for the ability using a digital environment.

“If you use a digital approach, you can actually keep upgrading and modifying, especially if it’s software-based, and make adjustments to the design before you start bending the metal,” he said. -he declares.

Brown said that after visiting program offices for both programs, he heard “positive” comments about the non-traditional approach.

“It’s a different approach, and it’s something we want to continue across the Air Force,” he said.

While the B-21 program has received praise from the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee as an example of progress on procurement reform, the Air Force recently announced that it will delay the B-21’s first test flight until in 2023. Brown did not address the delay or the reasons for it during his remarks.


Meanwhile, Brown said the Air Force’s project to connect sensors and gunners – the Advanced Combat Management System – was progressing. Since ABMS is not just a communications system, the service has focused on identifying all existing networks it can access.

The service took the time “to step back and look at what everyone is doing. … and then we can see each other much better, to now see the areas we need to focus on,” he said.

“We are making good progress now on how to better invest our resources to get us on our way,” he said.


Topics: Acquisition programs

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NYS Assemblyman Carrie Woerner discusses issues as she seeks re-election https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/nys-assemblyman-carrie-woerner-discusses-issues-as-she-seeks-re-election/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:36:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/nys-assemblyman-carrie-woerner-discusses-issues-as-she-seeks-re-election/ New York State Congresswoman Carrie Woerner is running for re-election. The Democrat of 113e Assembly District represented portions of Saratoga and Washington counties for four terms. In a 2020 rematch, Woerner will face Republican Dave Catalfamo in November to represent a newly drawn district. WAMC South Adirondack Office Chief Lucas Willard asked Woerner about the […]]]>

New York State Congresswoman Carrie Woerner is running for re-election.

The Democrat of 113e Assembly District represented portions of Saratoga and Washington counties for four terms.

In a 2020 rematch, Woerner will face Republican Dave Catalfamo in November to represent a newly drawn district.

WAMC South Adirondack Office Chief Lucas Willard asked Woerner about the new 113e which includes parts of Saratoga and the town of Glens Falls in Warren County. We spoke just days after a mid-level court ruled that Democratic-approved Assembly Districts were unconstitutional, but will remain in place for this year’s election.

I am a kind of flower where you are planted nobody. And I honestly think that as an elected official, the job is to represent fully and to the best of your ability the 100, and in my case, the 135,000 people that I represent, no matter where they live, in what kind of community they are, how far you need to drive or how far they are from where you live. And so, so I’m going, you know, this year, I’m going to run the way the neighborhood is designed. And if in two years it’s a different set of lines, I’m going to run, and I’m going to work just as hard for those people. If, if it were up to me, I would have kept the existing neighborhood and added Glens Falls, because I’ve learned to really love all of these communities in Washington County that I no longer represent, and, and I really feel they are an integral part of Washington County’s economy. And, you know, like you…and I think Glens Falls and Saratoga Springs and then this part of Saratoga County and Washington County are all connected in one economy. So, to me, it makes sense to connect all of these communities. I would gladly have gone from 130,000 to, you know, 150,000 if I could have kept them. Then we will flourish where we are planted.

I think it should be noted that the existing 113e who’s leaving in a few months, leans Republican, and what’s usually a pretty purple quarter, but historically, I believe he’s leaned Republican. The new district leans more Democratic. The legislature drew these maps that the governor approved, which are controlled by the Democrats. So did you provide some of that input by saying, you know, “It would be nice to have Glens Falls in this district, the new 113th?”

Certainly, you know, when I was asked my opinion on what I thought of, you know, what would be an appropriate way to change…because when we looked, when we looked at the numbers, based on from the census, the existing neighborhood that I had to change, there were two there were too many people in the existing neighborhood. And because Saratoga County is the only part of New York State that has grown… So when asked if they should change district lines, what would I consider as appropriate? I said, I thought Glens Falls and Saratoga Springs, because two small towns would be well connected to each other. They both have, you know, transit. They both have transit problems, because we don’t have enough transit. There is a single economy that connects them. There are people who live in Glens Falls who work in Saratoga County. Residents of North Saratoga County tend to go to Glens Falls Hospital for their health care. So even though it’s a separate MSA, the reality is that these communities from Saratoga Springs to Glens Falls tend to… you know, there’s a blurring of lines, there’s a lot of common interest and Saratoga County goes to Glens Falls, Glens Falls enters Saratoga County. So for me, it made sense if we were to put it back together to connect these two, two cities, because there are common interests, as well as common problems.

At the end of its session, the state legislature approved a package of 10 gun reforms following the shootings in Buffalo and Uvalde, Texas. Woerner voted against a provision that raises the legal age to purchase a semi-automatic rifle from 18 to 21. She explained why she voted against the bill eventually signed into law by Governor Kathy Hochul.

There is a difference between voting on a bill and voting on a concept. So the concept, which the governor was talking about, and which she illustrated by carrying a semi-automatic assault type firearm, was that for the semi-automatic assault type rifles, we were going to raise the age of 18 to 21 years old.

And conceptually, I think that’s a smart idea. I think a lot of people have realized that young people’s brains aren’t fully developed until they reach their twenties. And so we want people who have the ability to be responsible to have guns. We want people who don’t have the ability to be responsible not to have guns, especially the type of guns that assault weapons represent.

But this is not the bill we voted on. The bill we voted on talked about semi-automatic rifles, and that term semi-automatic rifle encompasses much more than assault type weapons. It encompasses a traditional deer gun, the kind of thing that families who are in the 113e Assembly District who hunt deer every fall…they use semi-automatic deer guns.

And by semi-automatic, we mean you load two shots into the rifle. You aim, you shoot first. And then the second round is automatically chambered so you don’t have to aim again. Why is this important? The deer are moving and the sound will scare them, and it will make them move. So you want to take the second picture very soon after the first.

These are not firearms that can be modified to have a high capacity magazine. They do not have the same accelerator as assault rifles. But this term “semi-automatic rifle” includes the standard rifle that everyone uses to hunt deer. So if the bill had been drafted to say “semi-automatic assault type firearm”, I would have voted yes. But that’s not what the bill says.

And so… I don’t think that was even the intention. But that is how the bill was drafted. And as a result, it will impact hunters across the state, law-abiding citizens who are fully empowered to own, store and use firearms responsibly and to do so at all times. . And I don’t think we wanted, I don’t think we wanted to make life difficult for them. I don’t think we’re trying to punish them. But that, in my view, is what the bill did, because it did not use specific language.

Would you support amending this bill in the next session?

Absolutely. And if the godmother does not do it herself, I will introduce this bill.

The Woerner district is home to semiconductor fab GlobalFoundries, which — with the help of federal dollars — plans to build a second fab at its Malta campus, now its global headquarters.

Woerner was a co-sponsor of the Green CHIPS Act, which would provide up to $500 million in tax credits per year for 20 years to support semiconductor manufacturing.

Woerner was asked about the legislation and fears it represents a corporate giveaway voiced by some lawmakers — including Democrat Phil Steck of Neighboring 110.e District.

You know, I’ve been educating Assembly leaders for years now about what happened with the incentives that were provided to Global Foundries. And I’m not going to get the exact numbers. But they incentivize…for the incentives they got, which at the time, in the early 2000s, was advertised as probably the biggest package ever, they think they hired 1,500 jobs, and let’s say $8 billion private investments. They created 3,000 jobs and invested nearly $15 billion.

It therefore triggered more private investment and created more jobs than expected. So for the right company in the right space where we have a workforce that can do those jobs, it’s a successful combination.

And so I think the education that I gave to the leaders of the … not just the elected leaders, but also the leaders of the staff … helped them see that. And so when the opportunity arose to pass this bill, I think our house was ready to take that step, despite the fact that people were raising important questions about whether tax incentives or Tax incentives for businesses are the best use of taxpayers’ money. But I think when it comes to semiconductors, in particular, we have a great example to cite.

Woerner, whose district is largely rural, also discussed his recently approved NY Textile Act, which aims to support the upstate plant and animal textile industry in a state that includes the fashion capital of the world. – New York.

My textile bill, which I’m happy to say passed by both houses and hopefully the governor will sign off on, has no fiscal impact. All it does is integrate textiles into existing economic development, government procurement, and agricultural and market programs, to increase visibility and focus on this industry as an opportunity and industry for growth for our upstate farmers and manufacturers connected to strong fashion. industry in the city.

Although Woerner faced a repeated challenge from Dave Catalfamo this year, she had little to say about running against the Republican again this year.

I will be in the community listening to people, talking to people who are looking for solutions to the problems they identify. And that’s what I do. He will do what he will do. But I’m going to do the things my constituents have always counted on me to do and hopefully that will convince them to re-elect me.

Woerner won the 2020 race by 10 points.

To hear Catalfamo, tune in to Midday Magazine on Sunday.

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Dental plan could be nearly double what the feds originally thought https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dental-plan-could-be-nearly-double-what-the-feds-originally-thought/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:50:26 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dental-plan-could-be-nearly-double-what-the-feds-originally-thought/ OTTAWA — The Parliamentary Budget Officer says the cost of a new dental program for uninsured low- and middle-income Canadians could be nearly double what the federal government originally estimated. OTTAWA — Time is running out for the government to deliver on its ambitious promise to New Democrats to provide a dental program for uninsured […]]]>

OTTAWA — The Parliamentary Budget Officer says the cost of a new dental program for uninsured low- and middle-income Canadians could be nearly double what the federal government originally estimated.

OTTAWA — Time is running out for the government to deliver on its ambitious promise to New Democrats to provide a dental program for uninsured low- and middle-income children by the end of the year, as cost estimates almost doubled.

The pledge is a key part of the Liberal government’s deal with the NDP to stave off an election until 2025. The Liberals have pledged to provide coverage by the end of the year for children living in households with an income of less than $90,000, then expanding year to include those under 18, seniors, and people living with disabilities.

The plan is to fully implement the program by 2025.

The government has just over six months to launch a brand new scheme, but still appears to be in the planning consultation phase and has yet to settle the most fundamental question: what form will this scheme take?

One option is to offer the program as a federal transfer to the provinces, which would administer it alongside existing dental programs or merge them.

But the NDP has always presented the program as a stand-alone federal dental plan, administered by federal staff to fill gaps in the patchwork of provincial and private programs across the country.

A third option of outsourcing the program to a private company is also on the table, according to several stakeholder groups who have held talks with government officials but are unable to speak publicly.

Each available path has its own pitfalls and would likely take more than six months to navigate, and it’s unclear what concessions the NDP is willing to accept to implement a federal dental program.

The government’s 2022 budget suggested the plan would cost $5.3 billion over the next five years, starting with a modest investment of $300 million this year to launch the children’s program.

But in a memo on statutory costs, the Parliamentary Budget Officer says the total cost of the program, if offered as a transfer to the provinces, could be closer to $9 billion, and the government would need to spend $939 million dollars this year to make it work.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer’s report underscores just how complicated the government’s job is in setting up a new dedicated program, the Canadian Dental Program said in a statement.

“While we fully support efforts by all levels of government to improve the oral health of Canadians, we are concerned that the previously announced timeline may be extremely ambitious given the complexity of this issue,” said Dr. Lynn Tomkins, president of the association.

So far, the government has held several one-on-one meetings and roundtables with a wide range of stakeholders, including those with an interest in healthcare, oral health and insurance.

A working group was set up to navigate between the different options. The executive director of this task force, Lindy Van Amburg, was not available for an interview.

Instead, Health Canada issued a statement indicating that coverage will be available to children this fiscal year, suggesting that the government could give itself a little more leeway by giving itself until the end of March to fulfill his agreement with the NDP.

“The Government of Canada is committed to meeting the timelines that have been established for this program and will provide more information as the design of the program progresses,” the statement said.

However, the timetable is ambitious. If, as the Parliamentary Budget Officer has interpreted, the government decides to transfer its dental care ambitions to the provinces, it will have to obtain the buy-in of 13 provinces and territories with a myriad of existing programs and their own industrial landscape. unique.

The dental association prefers this option because it would support existing programs that need funding, be less disruptive to the insurance industry, and pose a lower risk of people going without coverage during the transition.

The Liberals followed a similar process to meet their child care cost reduction targets last year, but it took nearly a year for all provinces and territories to agree.

The politics of signing new provincial and territorial dental care agreements may also be complicated by the fact that several provinces, including Quebec and British Columbia, have been pressing for more federal health transfer money with less political interference from Ottawa.

Contracting out a federal program comes with its own headaches. Some stakeholders have told the government it could provide the best value for money, but transparency and accountability could be lost if a private company takes over the coverage.

Awarding a multi-billion dollar procurement process would normally take over a year. Companies need time to prepare a bid, government officials need to carefully review each one, and that’s it before the winning company can start working on the program.

Anyone can guess how long it would take to launch a federal office with dedicated government staff.

The government will have to choose an option before it can even begin to dive into the arguably much more difficult and detailed work of deciding what services will be covered, how much reimbursement the plan will offer and how that will affect the industry as a whole.

It is also difficult to know precisely how much the program will cost. If, as some groups fear, provincial and employee insurance plans drop coverage and refer patients to the federal program, the Liberals’ promise to the NDP could become much more costly, very quickly.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on June 16, 2022.

Laura Osman, The Canadian Press

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Fluor Support Creates Diverse Pipeline for Engineering and Business – UofSC News & Events https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/fluor-support-creates-diverse-pipeline-for-engineering-and-business-uofsc-news-events/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:30:39 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/fluor-support-creates-diverse-pipeline-for-engineering-and-business-uofsc-news-events/ Published on: June 14, 2022; Updated on: June 14, 2022By Page Ivey, pivey@mailbox.sc.edu, 803-777-3085 Brenden Chavis wants to follow in his father’s career footsteps, but he wants to do it on his own. Chavis, a doctorate in computer science. student at the College of Engineering and Computer Science, says part of his interest in the […]]]>


Brenden Chavis wants to follow in his father’s career footsteps, but he wants to do it on his own.

Chavis, a doctorate in computer science. student at the College of Engineering and Computer Science, says part of his interest in the field – which he describes as using existing technology to create new technologies – comes from his father and part just out of his own curiosity.

“My dad works in technology, and I’ve always admired him and the work he does very much,” says Chavis. “He was definitely one of my influences when choosing what I wanted to do with my life. But I was always drawn to technology – computers. let the next novelty come out.

With a bachelor’s degree in information systems from Mount St. Mary’s University in Maryland and a master’s degree in data analytics from North Carolina A&T, Chavis is progressing through UofSC’s computer science doctoral program and plans to graduate in December 2023.

One of Chavis’ goals is to self-fund his education, and through programs funded by Fluor Corp., he does just that.

Chavis receives funding and internships from Fluor through the Graduate Degree Consortium for Minorities in Engineering and Science (GEM) as well as through the BRIDGE to the Doctorate Grant awarded by the National Science Foundation. Both programs aim to increase the number of underrepresented minority graduate students in engineering and other STEM fields.

Either way, the programs help provide a community of scholars and networking opportunities.

“The fraternity is meant to be a tight-knit community of like-minded thinkers,” Chavis says, adding that his father had also been a GEM fellow. “It was just something that made sense to me. I always wanted to be the person I got to graduate from.

Building a diverse talent pool for future employment needs is a primary goal of Fluor’s global college sponsorship programs at 33 colleges and universities around the world. South Carolina has been part of this program since 2010, but the university’s relationship with Fluor dates back to 1989.

The capstone course gives students the opportunity to learn more about Fluor and for us to get to know them and their abilities. Students with these types of experiences are more competitive after graduation. Over the years we have hired several UofSC students who are now volunteering their time to help the next generation of Capstone design students.

Torrence Robinson, Senior Director of Global Community Affairs and President of the Fluor Foundation

Currently, Fluor provides funding of approximately $50,000 per year that helps support several programs and student organizations in business and engineering schools. Fluor executives also serve on the university’s advisory boards.

Other engineering programs sponsored by Fluor include the First Generation program and Summer Start. At the Darla Moore School of Business, Fluor supports a diversity and inclusion program, the Net Impact Club, the Welcome Back “Business Bash”, Graduate Women in Business and the Institute for Management Accountants.

“The value is in the relationship, those opportunities for dialogue with faculty and students,” says Torrence Robinson, senior director of global community affairs and president of the Fluor Foundation. “We are focused on supporting current students to broaden the pool of graduates who will work not only in our core areas of engineering, procurement and construction, but also in other areas of applied science and business. .”

Robinson says about 100 of Fluor’s current employees are South Carolina graduates, including 1992 mechanical engineer Zane Reed. Reed, manager of Fluor’s mechanical equipment department, also leads Fluor’s Capstone Senior Project, which brings together engineering students and Fluor employees to work on real engineering challenges.

“The capstone course gives students the opportunity to learn more about Fluor and for us to get to know them and their abilities,” says Robinson. “Students with these types of experiences are more competitive after graduation. Over the years we have hired several UofSC students who are now volunteering their time to help the next generation of Capstone design students.

Chavis has also had this type of experiential learning as well as a GEM Fellow, most recently working at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory on a variety of projects.

“I can do all the research I want to do. I can push myself further in my studies,” says Chavis. “These scholarships have given me an opportunity that I never really thought I would have, and I’m able to do it myself, which I’m really proud of.”


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Topics: Students, Alumni, Academics, Research, Scholarships, Graduate Studies, Partnerships, Careers, Student Voices, College of Engineering and Computer Science

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Long Beach parklet program nearing end with few businesses seeking permanent installations • Long Beach Post News https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/long-beach-parklet-program-nearing-end-with-few-businesses-seeking-permanent-installations-long-beach-post-news/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 15:15:41 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/long-beach-parklet-program-nearing-end-with-few-businesses-seeking-permanent-installations-long-beach-post-news/ Leaders will vote on a proposal that would allow extensions for business owners hoping to make their outdoor facilities permanent, which would require investing in sustainable designs and materials and securing the spaces. But about 80% of the city’s temporary parklets could be removed with the end of the program. Of the 130 temporary facilities […]]]>

Leaders will vote on a proposal that would allow extensions for business owners hoping to make their outdoor facilities permanent, which would require investing in sustainable designs and materials and securing the spaces. But about 80% of the city’s temporary parklets could be removed with the end of the program.

Of the 130 temporary facilities set up by businesses across the city, only 25 owners have expressed interest in converting them to permanent structures, according to a memo from Public Works Director Eric Lopez.

Parklet owners who submit plans to make their facilities permanent could have until the end of September to retain their temporary spaces as long as they submit an application to the city by August 1.

Outdoor seating and dining areas have been credited with helping some restaurants through some of the worst times of the pandemic, especially when county and local health ordinances banned people from dining indoors to help slow down transmission of COVID-19.

However, others presented the temporary scheme as a public safety issue that made it difficult for people with disabilities to navigate crowded sidewalks, and as a public nuisance, which created quality of life issues for homes. neighbors because of the loud noises of the guests and removal of parking spaces.

On Tuesday, the board could approve a recommendation to let the program expire at the end of June, a deadline it set last September when it approved another extension because case rates and the test positivity rate were still relatively high. .

Data from the Long Beach Health Department shows that as of Friday, Long Beach had a daily case rate of 21.1 cases per 100,000 residents and a test positivity rate of 11.9% – figures which have been slowly increasing over the past few weeks due to the emergence of new variants of the virus.

Jennifer Rice Epstein, spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services, said that as indoor dining is currently permitted under the existing health order, the removal of some outdoor dining options is not a problem for the health service.

However, since the city is still considered in the yellow tier of the CDC’s transmission guidelines, it advises people to be cautious.

“We always urge people to take common sense action when they’ve found themselves indoors with people when they don’t know each other’s status,” Rice Epstein said.

While county health officials have recently discussed the possible return of indoor masking requirements due to high case rates, Rice Epstein said she was not aware of any similar discussion from the from Long Beach health officials. However, the city just expanded masking requirements for public transit.

The municipal council will meet on June 14 at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting. He will also convene his Charter Amendments Committee to discuss placing two measures on the November ballot that could merge the city’s water and gas utilities and revamp the city’s police complaints commission.

Belmont Shore parklets set to phase out amid low demand for permanent structures

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EPA requests information on battery end-of-life management https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/epa-requests-information-on-battery-end-of-life-management/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 23:20:10 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/epa-requests-information-on-battery-end-of-life-management/ The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery (ORCR) issued a Request for Information (RFI) on June 9, 2022, seeking information on end-of-life management batteries, including their generation, collection, recycling and reuse, as well as labeling standards and current end-of-life requirements for batteries. 87 Fed. Reg. 35202. According to RFI, the […]]]>

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery (ORCR) issued a Request for Information (RFI) on June 9, 2022, seeking information on end-of-life management batteries, including their generation, collection, recycling and reuse, as well as labeling standards and current end-of-life requirements for batteries. 87 Fed. Reg. 35202. According to RFI, the EPA is developing best practices with respect to collecting batteries for recycling, as well as establishing a program to promote battery recycling through the development of environmental guidelines. voluntary battery labeling and communication materials for battery producers and consumers under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act 2021. Comments are due July 11, 2022. According to the RFI, the EPA will hold feedback sessions offering stakeholders an opportunity to provide oral feedback. The EPA has posted the dates and times for the feedback sessions on its website — June 14, 2022from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (EDT), and June 15, 2022, 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. (EDT). The EPA says stakeholders can stay informed about feedback sessions by registering online.

The EPA states that the RFI seeks information on single-use batteries, also called primary batteries, and rechargeable batteries, also called secondary batteries; all battery chemicals, including but not limited to: lithium-based, nickel-metal hydride, and other battery chemicals; and all types of batteries, such as small consumer batteries, full-size batteries (including electric vehicles and grid energy storage), and industrial batteries used in manufacturing, commercial businesses, and power operations. health, to inform the scope of battery collection best practices, voluntary labeling guidelines for batteries and other forms of communication media for battery producers and consumers regarding the reuse and recycling of critical materials from batteries. The RFI invites input from all stakeholders involved in the battery lifecycle, from manufacturing to end-of-life management, including but not limited to the public, industry, researchers , universities, state, tribal, and local governments, other federal agencies, community groups, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and international organizations. In addition to stakeholders involved in small consumer batteries, the EPA notes that it is also seeking input from stakeholders involved in large format batteries (including electric vehicles and grid energy storage) and industrial batteries used in manufacturing, commercial businesses and healthcare operations. .

The EPA says it has already worked to learn more about proper battery end-of-life management from its past work to increase recycling of batteries or electronics. To build on this information and better inform the development of best practices with respect to the collection of batteries for recycling and establish a program to promote battery recycling through the development of voluntary labeling guidelines for batteries and Disclosure Materials Under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Act, EPA identified several key information categories on which stakeholder feedback would be most helpful:

  • Scope and prioritization of battery collection best practices: Suggested questions provide an opportunity for all reviewers to give their thoughts on battery types, such as small consumer batteries and full-size batteries (including electric vehicles and grid energy storage) and battery chemistries including but not limited to: lithium-based, nickel-metal hydride and other battery chemistries to inform scope of best practices. For lead-acid batteries, the EPA says it is aware that these batteries are made with antimony, a critical mineral, and are currently being recycled at a high rate, particularly from vehicles; thus, lead-acid batteries may not be considered in battery collection best practices. The EPA, however, wants information on other lead-acid batteries, such as small sealed lead-acid batteries that cannot be recycled at a high rate. The suggested questions also seek information to inform the prioritization of battery types/chemistries that collection best practices should target, which will help increase the recovery of critical minerals, while ensuring the safe recycling of used batteries. The EPA is also interested in any existing studies or reports that contain general information about batteries, their collection and recycling, as well as in-appliance batteries and stand-alone batteries.

  • Understand the battery collection and recycling system: To help the EPA better understand the collection and management of end-of-life batteries, the EPA requests information about key entities in the battery recycling process, including all intermediate facilities in the process. In addition to consumer batteries, the EPA says it is also interested in information on electric vehicle and grid energy storage batteries.

  • Information on battery labeling guidelines for reuse and recycling: Under the bipartisan Infrastructure Act, the EPA is required to develop voluntary labeling guidelines for batteries and other forms of communication media for battery producers and consumers regarding battery reuse and disposal. recycling critical battery materials. To undertake this effort, the EPA states that it would like to obtain information on the scope of the development of voluntary labeling guidelines and understand existing labeling guidelines on batteries, as well as other forms of storage media. communication for battery producers and consumers regarding the reuse and recycling of critical battery materials, including information on existing communication materials that have been developed on battery end-of-life management. In addition to labeling guidelines and communication media for consumer batteries, the EPA is also interested in communication media for electric vehicles and grid energy storage batteries.

  • Information on the reuse and recycling of batteries communication supports for producers and consumers of batteries: Under the bipartisan Infrastructure Act, the EPA is required to develop other forms of communication materials for battery producers and consumers regarding the reuse and recycling of critical battery materials. To undertake this effort, the EPA states that it would like to understand existing communication materials that have been developed on the reuse and recycling of critical battery materials aimed at battery producers and consumers. The EPA would also like to understand existing communication materials that have been developed to help consumers know how and where to recycle their batteries. According to the RFI, in addition to the communication materials on the recycling of small consumer batteries, the EPA is also interested in the existing communication materials on large format batteries (electric vehicles and grid energy storage) and batteries industrial.

Following each category of information, the RFI includes a list of suggested questions for stakeholders to consider when preparing comments. According to the RFI, the EPA is interested in information on small-format, large-format and industrial batteries. EPA encourages commenters to provide any other comments or information that EPA should consider in developing best practices for collecting batteries for recycling, voluntary labeling guidelines for batteries, and communication materials. for battery producers and consumers on the reuse and recycling of critical materials from batteries. EPA asks commenters to include, where possible, supporting data or other qualitative information such as information on barriers and challenges to collecting batteries for recycling and labels. of batteries, successful battery collection programs and battery labels, as well as details of measurable benefits to industry, government, or consumers.

Comment

This RFI is one of a series of RFIs that the EPA issues to inform the development of new programs under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Act. Other related information requests include the Solid Waste Infrastructure Grant Program for Recycling (87 Fed. Reg. 35200) and Recycling Education and Outreach — Grant Program and Model Recycling Program Toolkit (87 Fed. 35197). Additionally, the U.S. Department of Energy will issue future RFIs to advise its work supporting battery recycling under the bipartisan Infrastructure Act, including several grant programs that support battery collection, safe storage and transport, recycling and second use. Stakeholder input to this RFI will inform EPA’s efforts to develop best practices with the collection of batteries for recycling, as well as to establish a program to promote battery recycling through the development of guidelines. voluntary labeling for batteries and other forms of communication material for battery producers and consumers on the reuse and recycling of critical battery materials.

This EPA request provides stakeholders with an opportunity to inform and comment on best practices for developing guidance and advancing voluntary labeling. Efforts by foreign jurisdictions to address the complexity of battery recycling programs should also allow interested parties to comment as the EPA undertakes these efforts to better understand recovery and recycling from end uses. consumer and industry endpoints. EPA offers, with this RFI, the opportunity to comment on the specific activities of other parties, active in this space globally, to weigh and better inform future actions on this critical waste stream.

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Statewide Nursing Programs See New Legislature Funding, But Some Existing Programs Left Out | Washington https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/statewide-nursing-programs-see-new-legislature-funding-but-some-existing-programs-left-out-washington/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 06:25:37 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/statewide-nursing-programs-see-new-legislature-funding-but-some-existing-programs-left-out-washington/ OLYMPIA — As the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated a shortage of healthcare workers in Washington and nationwide, the state legislature this year provided more than $38 million to nursing programs across the country. the state. But not everything was evenly distributed. Some schools, like Eastern Washington University, got funding to create a new four-year program […]]]>

OLYMPIA — As the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated a shortage of healthcare workers in Washington and nationwide, the state legislature this year provided more than $38 million to nursing programs across the country. the state.

But not everything was evenly distributed.

Some schools, like Eastern Washington University, got funding to create a new four-year program while others, including Washington State University, got none for strengthen their current programs. Lawmakers and university officials say it’s solely because of the funding requested by each school this year.

Senator Christine Rolfes, Democratic chair of the Bainbridge Island Ways and Means Committee, said budget drafters looked across the state at what schools were asking for and where additional funding needs lay. The Legislature did not provide additional funding for all higher education nursing programs, she said, but instead looked to where it wanted to increase enrollment.

“It was the first time we said, ‘Let’s take a full look at this,'” Rolfes said. “There is a shortage of nurses and we had disposable income.

She said there was a lack of training programs in the eastern corner of the state.

Eastern Washington University has received $6.1 million over the next two years to expand its current two-year nursing program to a full four-year program.

It was a plan Eastern talked about a year from now, but with the current nursing shortage and additional revenue this year, lawmakers decided to push to provide that funding sooner, said Rep. Joe Schmick, R. -Colfax.

Schmick said the university already had meeting space and a program it planned to use, and was just waiting for the money.

“Due to the shortage of nurses, we didn’t want to wait,” Schmick said. “It’s all on deck.”

The East four-year nursing program is still in the planning stages and is currently awaiting approval from the state Nursing Quality Assurance Commission.

According to a presentation made to the university’s board of trustees, the program will begin accepting student applications in January with the goal of accepting the first cohort of 40 students in the fall of 2023. There will be 160 places at the total in the program.

The nursing school is in the process of hiring staff and developing a facilities plan before starting construction in the near future.

Rolfes said another reason for funding Eastern’s program was its location and the participants it normally receives. She said Eastern often has more of a tradition of students attending high schools in the area, which might “meet a different need.”

Chris Mulick, director of state relations at WSU, said they did not apply for funding for new nursing enrollment slots this year. They try to keep their budget requests “pretty narrow,” he said.

Mulick said he was contacted by House leaders to offer a cost proposal for expanding nursing slots, but it was never funded.

“It happens,” he said. “We receive many requests to estimate the cost of a program.”

Rolfes said there’s no specific reason Washington State University didn’t get funding this year, other than the fact the university didn’t specifically request it and that legislators did not think it was necessary.

Much of what higher education institutions receive from the legislature depends on what they ask for, and that varies from school to school each year, Mulick said.

“It’s pretty rare that you all end up getting paid for the same thing,” he said. “We have six public universities that are very different and have very different needs in our state.”

In addition to Eastern, three other public higher education programs have received funding for nursing education.

Western Washington University received funding this year to create a new Master of Science and Nursing program, which will enroll 10 to 15 students each year.

They will receive $461,000 over the next two years. They also received $433,000 to increase their registered nurse’s enrollment in the baccalaureate nursing program.

The University of Washington has received more than $1.2 million for additional nursing slots at the Seattle and Tacoma campuses.

Technical and community colleges received more than $3.7 million for at least 50 additional nursing positions.

The Legislative Assembly has also set aside more than $15 million to upgrade simulation lab equipment at community colleges, universities and public high schools. They also allocated $3 million for a loan repayment program for nurse educators, which will provide up to $75,000 in loan repayment in exchange for three years of service.

Most of the new slots funded this year won’t be available until 2023, so it may take budget writers a few years to see if what they’ve funded this year will be enough to meet demand, Rolfes said.

There is a shortage of nurses at all educational and professional levels, Rolfes said. The Legislative Assembly will need to determine what needs to be done to increase the demand for courses in the future.

“In the meantime, we’ve created more supply,” she said. “But we’ll have to see, will those slots fill up?” Will students enroll?


Washington's new gun, shooting practice and abortion laws go into effect Thursday

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