Existing Programs – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:53:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Existing Programs – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 4 Big Ways the Cut Inflation Act is investing in rural America https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/4-big-ways-the-cut-inflation-act-is-investing-in-rural-america/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:53:35 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/4-big-ways-the-cut-inflation-act-is-investing-in-rural-america/ To fight climate change, the United States is making a historic investment in farmers, ranchers, and rural communities, helping them reduce emissions, prepare for the climate impacts already here, and create good jobs along the way. road. The Cut Inflation Act will direct about $20 billion toward agricultural conservation programs and nearly $14 billion toward […]]]>

To fight climate change, the United States is making a historic investment in farmers, ranchers, and rural communities, helping them reduce emissions, prepare for the climate impacts already here, and create good jobs along the way. road.

The Cut Inflation Act will direct about $20 billion toward agricultural conservation programs and nearly $14 billion toward clean energy for rural America.

To stabilize the climate and maintain a safe and vibrant planet, we need to shift to climate-smart agriculture and clean energy. The new legislation will accelerate efforts already underway and launch new ones.

Here are the Inflation Reduction Act’s most impactful climate investments in rural America.

1. Open the door for more farmers to use conservation programs

US Department of Agriculture conservation programs are underfunded and oversubscribed. On average, three farmers wish to participate for each available slot.

With the additional funding from the Inflation Reduction Act, the USDA can open the door wider, allowing more farmers to participate in conservation programs.

These are farmers who already enjoy conservation but need financial or technical assistance to make the transition. The increased funding should enable climate-smart practices to be put on the ground quickly.

Equally important, tackling climate change is now a stated priority for these conservation programs, with guidance in law to prioritize practices that reduce methane and nitrous oxide and help store carbon in floors.

These programs will continue to prioritize other vitally important conservation outcomes like clean water when considering farmers’ applications, but now climate change will also be on the list.

2. Create a solid foundation for the next Farm Bill

The Farm Bill — a gigantic bill that comes around every five years that largely determines what food we eat and how it’s grown — is the biggest single source of funding for conservation on private land. . It is a powerful vehicle for reducing emissions and building resilience to the impacts of climate change nationwide.

The Cut Inflation Act extends funding for conservation programs authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill and makes additional investments in conservation.

This means that funding for critical conservation work is assured, as long as Congress avoids reversing these historic investments. Instead of focusing on preserving the amount of conservation funds available, energy can be directed towards creative ideas for advancing climate-smart agriculture.

Conservation funding from the Cut Inflation Act offers enormous potential for agricultural producers and environmentalists to work together on incentive solutions that are sustainable and equitable.

3. Measure progress to improve future investments in the fight against climate change

The Cut Inflation Act provides $300 million for the USDA’s Office of Energy and Environmental Policy to establish a program to measure the climate impact of conservation programs run by the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

These funds can be used to aggregate and analyze existing data or conduct new research to improve measurement, reporting and verification on farms and within regions.

This is the decisive decade to work towards a better climate future. Having dedicated funds to measure progress is hugely important for farmers, ranchers, taxpayers and the climate. Good science and data will ensure that every dollar spent through public or private efforts has maximum impact.

4. Invest in clean rural energy to create jobs and reduce pollution

One of the most important parts of the Reducing Inflation Act — both for rural economies and for climate change — is a $14 billion investment to help rural electric farms and co-ops transition to clean energy.

This will create around 90,000 good jobs in rural communities, which have seen thousands of jobs migrate to cities in recent decades. This will not reverse the trend in itself, but it will kick-start economic revitalization and opportunity. It is also one of the biggest emission reduction opportunities in law and will make rural power grids more reliable and resilient.

The Inflation Reduction Act investments in rural America show that the United States is serious about reducing climate risks and expanding opportunities to be part of the climate solution. Over the coming decades, we will all benefit from less pollution and more resilient economies and food supplies.

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Thom Sherman exits, Amy Reisenbach replaces him – Deadline https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/thom-sherman-exits-amy-reisenbach-replaces-him-deadline/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:11:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/thom-sherman-exits-amy-reisenbach-replaces-him-deadline/ EXCLUSIVE: The change at the helm of CBS’ entertainment operations continues. I hear that Thom Sherman is stepping down as Senior Executive Vice President, Programming, CBS Entertainment and getting an extended production deal with the company. The move follows news reported by Deadline earlier this morning that CBS veteran Kelly Kahl will step down as […]]]>

EXCLUSIVE: The change at the helm of CBS’ entertainment operations continues. I hear that Thom Sherman is stepping down as Senior Executive Vice President, Programming, CBS Entertainment and getting an extended production deal with the company. The move follows news reported by Deadline earlier this morning that CBS veteran Kelly Kahl will step down as president of entertainment at the end of the year. I heard that the network’s current head, Amy Reisenbach, will be named the new president of entertainment.

“Team – I want you to be aware of an important transition happening today,” Cheeks said in his memo announcing Kahl’s impending exit this morning.

The departures of Kahl and Sherman and the promotion of Reisenbach are part of the same “leadership restructuring and streamlining” in the network’s entertainment division, I hear. Details are still hazy, but word is that CBS Entertainment’s top job, which in the past was held by one person including Nina Tassler and Glenn Geller, will once again be consolidated and held by Reisenbach.

This is the biggest leadership change for Cheeks since he joined ViacomCBS nearly three years ago to oversee the CBS brands. It comes on a day of layoffs at CBS parent company Paramount Global, mostly in TV divisions. It also comes amid ongoing consolidation as broadcast ratings decline – there are no dedicated senior entertainment executives on the other two Big 3 networks, ABC and NBC, where the same executive oversees both the broadcast network and its sister streaming platform.

UPDATE 11:35 a.m.: Cheeks and Sherman sent internal memos (you can read them below) confirming that Sherman is stepping down from his executive position and that the company is “entering into an overall production agreement covering CBS Entertainment and CBS Studios, with Thom continuing to develop and produce programs for the Network and other parts of Paramount Global,” as Cheeks put it.

In his memo, Sherman called Kahl “the brother I never had, my friend, and the best working partner I could have imagined” and listed some of their administration’s greatest accomplishments.

As executive vice president of current programs, Reisenbach led the combined department that oversees current programming for CBS Entertainment and CBS Studios. Additionally, she oversaw CBS Daytime.

Reisenbach, who is well-regarded in the creative community, was previously SVP, Current Programs, from September 2015 to June 2017, overseeing all studio-produced series for The CW, while continuing to work on several shows airing on CBS. She joined CBS Studios in 2005 as head of current programs, was promoted to director a year later and named vice president in 2011.

Previously, she worked at Warner Bros. Television in the Drama and Current Development departments.

Sherman joined CBS in 2017 from The CW. Since then, he has overseen the development of successful additions to the network’s program such as FBI and fallout FBI: Most Wanted and FBI: international, The Equalizer, NCIS: Hawaiiand new escape land of fire on the dramatic side like comedies The neighborhood, Bob ♥ Abishola and Ghosts. CBS has remained the most-watched broadcast network for the past 14 years, and the network leads the pack again this fall with 17 of the 25 most-watched entertainment programs of the season so far.

Sherman joined CBS from The CW where, as Executive Vice President and Chief Programming Officer, he developed and oversaw series such as Arrow, The Vampire Diaries, Gossip Girl, the flash and Joan the Virgin.

From 2004 to 2006, Sherman served as president of JJ Abrams’ Bad Robot Productions, where he helped oversee the first two seasons of Lost and the last two seasons of A.k.a.

From 1996 to 2004, Sherman worked in drama series development at ABC, the last five years as a department head. At ABC, he was responsible for the development and/or supervision of series such as Lost, Desperate Housewives, Grey’s Anatomy, Alias, NYPD Blue, The Practice and Once again.

Team – As I wrote to you earlier, we are restructuring and streamlining the management team at CBS Entertainment. As part of this, our colleague Thom Sherman will step down from his role as Senior Executive Vice President, Programming by the end of this year. Below, please see the note Thom sent to his team earlier today.

At the same time, I’m happy to share that Thom will remain connected to CBS. We enter into a global production agreement spanning CBS Entertainment and CBS Studios, with Thom continuing to develop and produce programming for the network and other parts of Paramount Global. Thom’s creative instincts about the kinds of shows CBS viewers love are clear to all of us. I’m glad we’re continuing to leverage those instincts and his programming skills as both a producer and an advisor.

Thom has been a highly respected creative executive at CBS, The CW and as president of JJ Abrams’ production company Bad Robot. His connections, skills and experience provide great value as a producer in this new capacity.

Please join me in thanking Thom for all his contributions to the Network and wishing him well in his new role at CAS.

george

Email from Sherman:

Crew,

The news this morning was shocking, and I know you are all as saddened by it as I am. Kelly is the brother I never had, my friend and the best work partner I could have imagined. I am beyond grateful for his resolute leadership, guidance, collaboration, and humor, and it’s hard to imagine he and I won’t be doing this together again.

And, alas, I too will move on to a new stage in my career next year.

I have had the great privilege of working with all of you for the past 5 1/2 years. You are a remarkable group of immensely talented people, the best in the business at what you do, and I am immensely honored to have stood by your side as, season after season, together, we programmed America’s #1 Network .

Look at some of the many things we’ve accomplished:

–We’ve put together a list of shows that are the envy of the Business with the #1 New Drama on Broadcast 5 years in a row, and this year’s Top 3 New Shows. We also launched new #1 comedy 4 consecutive seasons, and now last year’s #1 hit, “Ghosts”, battles with one of our other big hits, “Young Sheldon”, for the #1 comedy slot OVERALL Broadcast. Powerful.

–CBS is now recognized for its diversity in front of and behind the camera; an incredible turnaround that we should all be very proud of.

–We’ve worked hard to change the culture within CBS to be more inclusive, welcoming, warm, fun, and (relatively!) stress-free. Considerable progress made.

But more importantly than the above successes we’ve shared, your talents are only matched by your kindness. I am blessed to have worked with all of you, truly great, exceptionally kind and caring people. Thank you all for helping to create an inspiring and nurturing environment and for the dedication and brilliance with which you all do your job. I will carry you all in my heart as we continue our travels, and I look forward to continuing our friendships.

Now go throw a Thom’s Tear up on the board.

And play well.

Thomas

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Curriculum rooted in Sharon’s gardening program connects students with the food needs of the community https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/curriculum-rooted-in-sharons-gardening-program-connects-students-with-the-food-needs-of-the-community/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 19:12:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/curriculum-rooted-in-sharons-gardening-program-connects-students-with-the-food-needs-of-the-community/ Sharon Academy student Evan Hastings, 15, cuts tomato plants while preparing the Food Justice Garden in Sharon, Vt., for winter on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Hastings took an elective course in a month on regenerative agriculture and the history of Indigenous lands and climate justice taught at the academy by Karen Ganey, of Regeneration Corps. […]]]>
Sharon Academy student Evan Hastings, 15, cuts tomato plants while preparing the Food Justice Garden in Sharon, Vt., for winter on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Hastings took an elective course in a month on regenerative agriculture and the history of Indigenous lands and climate justice taught at the academy by Karen Ganey, of Regeneration Corps. Photo by James M. Patterson/Valley News

This story by Frances Mize first appeared in the Valley News on November 11.

SHARON — When fall was as hot as summer, Oli Shipman brushed the dirt off potatoes she harvested from a community garden on Route 14, preparing them for delivery to the Sharon’s food shelf.

She also made salsa for the food shelf, from the tomatoes and peppers that had ripened on green vines during the growing season.

On Monday, as the cold wind blew across the low, flat ground just across the White River, Shipman, a 10th grader at Sharon Academy, was back to work in the garden. Covering the paths between the flower beds with mulch to keep the grass from spreading in the winter, Shipman was putting the garden to bed.

The Sharon Food Justice Garden, which is maintained and operated primarily by students enrolled in an elective course at the TSA, is a project of Regeneration Corps – a collaboration between Vermont high school students and representatives of various nonprofit organizations , including Vital Communities, Building a Local Economy (BALE) and rural Vermont.

The group hopes to foster students’ “practical and regenerative land-based skills”, an agricultural and ecological knowledge base, and community organizing experience.

“We have this framework where we really hope to change the way education is delivered, making it more experiential and solution-oriented,” said Karen Ganey, a Regenerative Corps educator who taught the ASD class.

The program combined teachings about the history of Indigenous lands and climate justice, which hopes to shift from fossil fuels and large-scale agriculture in a racially equitable way, to regenerative farming techniques – like no-till agriculture and cover cropping. The methods aim to keep agricultural soils healthy, rather than depleting them of nutrients during extractive growing seasons.

“We give children the opportunity to learn real skills in the field, working in the gardens of farms, because we recognize and know that industrial agriculture is one of the main contributors to climate change,” said Ganey. “But his backhand is also where a lot of the solutions are.”

Sharon Food Shelf volunteer Cameron Speth, left, greets Alden, of Youth Empowerment and Action, middle, and Jasper Erhard, of Strafford, as they deliver the day’s harvest from the Food Justice Garden in Sharon, Vermont, Wednesday, August 24, 2022 Volunteers harvested and donated 150 pounds of produce to the food shelf this growing season. Photo by James M. Patterson/Valley News

Through Flexible Pathways, a Vermont educational initiative that gives students credit for personalized educational opportunities, the Regeneration Corps class could easily be integrated into students’ existing schedules at school.

Shipman found her way to the garden through Youth Empowerment and Action, a teen-led advocacy group based in Tunbridge and Sharon and focused on climate solutions through sustainable agriculture. Beyond TSA’s choice, the Sharon Garden has become a touchstone for area teens and adults interested in regenerative agriculture as a way to fight climate change.

“I think it’s an interesting concept and nobody really talks about it,” Shipman said.

The garden itself, which is the practical basis for what the course teaches in the classroom, was started last summer with a $5,400 grant from the New England Grass Roots Environment Fund. This enabled the group to purchase the materials needed to grow over 150 pounds of food for the Sharon Food Shelf.

Sharon’s Oli Shipman, center, Dan “Rudi” Rudell, second from right, and Sharon Academy Middle School math teacher Linda Jagoda, right, lay cardboard in the walking paths of the Food Justice Garden in Sharon, Vermont, while preparing the plot for winter on Monday, November 7, 2022. The cardboard was covered with wood shavings to keep grass and weeds from growing. From left to right are volunteer Avery Mornis, Regeneration Corps facilitator Karen Gainey and Alden of Youth Empowerment and Action. Photo by James M. Patterson/Valley News

At the core of Regeneration Corps’ mission is to address the challenges and “enrich the lives” of “youth, teachers and farmers during the pandemic (COVID-19)”. Through choice, students learn best practices, but they also gain practical skills and get time outside of the classroom.

“Our goal is not to overwhelm them,” Ganey said. “Some of these students are just coming out of the pandemic and have been home for a long time and are exploring their identity.”

She stressed that an essential part of the curriculum in the garden is the opportunity to hone skills and explore passions, while connecting to “place and purpose”.

“I think it’s really helpful for kids to have that sense of possibility and connections to real solutions,” Ganey said, adding that a student told him he felt “climate desperation.”

Even on the cold, gray days, as summer gave way to fall, Sharon Academy students emerged from the minibus they were taking from school to the garden, ready to get their hands dirty.

Alden harvests tomatoes to donate to the Sharon Food Shelf at the Food Justice Garden in Sharon, Vermont on Wednesday, August 24, 2022. The garden was planted in the spring by Sharon Academy students and tended all summer on the days of weekly work by Alden, Ganey and some volunteers. Photo by James M. Patterson/Valley News

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Tags: agriculture, environment, farms, flex lanes, food, food shelf, gardening, high school, native, Regenerative Corps, Rural Vermont, Sharon Academy, students, White River

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