Existing Programs – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Sat, 19 Jun 2021 21:56:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Existing Programs – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 Trinity Launches Ireland’s First Online MBA https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/trinity-launches-irelands-first-online-mba/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/trinity-launches-irelands-first-online-mba/#respond Sat, 19 Jun 2021 18:22:36 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/trinity-launches-irelands-first-online-mba/ The new Matrix room at Trinity Business SchoolPhoto Chris Bellew / Fennell Photography Copyright 2021 With online MBA programs popping up all over the world, Trinity Business School has launched the first online option in Ireland. With a full tuition fee of € 35,000 ($ 41,740), the two-year program is far more expensive than the […]]]>


The new Matrix room at Trinity Business School
Photo Chris Bellew / Fennell Photography Copyright 2021

With online MBA programs popping up all over the world, Trinity Business School has launched the first online option in Ireland. With a full tuition fee of € 35,000 ($ 41,740), the two-year program is far more expensive than the cost of the more disruptive options in the United States or Europe.

The Gies College of Business at the University of Illinois has one of the most successful online MBA programs at a cost of just $ 22,000, half the price of Trinity’s program (see Gies’ iMBA: Inside A Disruptive Online MBA Option), while ESMT Berlin in Europe launched an online MBA for $ 30,000, or over $ 10,000 less (see ESMT Berlin enters the online MBA market).

ESMT Berlin and Trinity are the newest players in online MBA in Europe, a market where the dominant schools have been the Spanish IE Business School, the first school in Europe to launch an online MBA, as well as Warwick Business. British School and Imperial College Business School. in London. IE Business School’s Global Online MBA currently costs € 51,200 IE ($ 61,667), while Imperial charges € 48,020 (€ 39,870) and Warwick is priced at € 39,660 ($ 32,930) . Imperial Oil’s online offering is the first international program to achieve a ranking of Poets and Quants.

THE TRINITY ONLINE MBA AWARD IS ABOUT THE SAME AS THE COST OF ITS FULL-TIME AND EXISTING EMBA

Andrew Burke, Dean of Trinity Business School
Photo Chris Bellew / Fennell Photography Copyright 2019

Trinity is pricing her online option at roughly the same cost as her full-time MBA, which currently costs € 35,800, as well as her existing Executive MBA of € 35,800 in which students take on-campus classes on Mondays and Tuesdays. evenings and four Saturdays per term. The school’s EMBA program also includes a trio of compulsory block weeks over a two-year period, which includes one week of international residency in Brussels.

In preparation for four years, the Trinity option will welcome its first cohort in September 2021. Called the Flexible Executive MBA, the blended program will be 80% online and the remaining 20% ​​on the school’s campus in Dublin. will involve 20% learning on campus and welcome its first cohort in September 2021.

“With huge swathes of the world of work become remote due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the launch of our new Flexible Executive MBA is certainly timely,” Trinity Dean Andrew Burke said in a statement. “However, the reality is that it lasts four years; having been driven by the growing trends of remote, flexible and juggling co-working parents and other new forms of work.

Online classes will be delivered in the school’s new Matrix room, which Trinity describes as a state-of-the-art interactive center developed exclusively for the program.

THE FIRST YEAR CONSISTS OF A SERIES OF BASIC MODULES PLUS THE START-UP OF A BUSINESS PROJECT

The program kicks off with the Michaelmas semester, which runs from September to December, and will consist of three core modules comprising a mix of lecturers, guest lecturers, live action learning, projects and a workshop. Over the course of a one-week block, online MBA students will study Accounting and Financial Management, with the other pair of core courses covering People Management in Organizations and Strategic Management.

The Hilary Term, which will run from January to March, will add four more core modules as well as a business project. The course will include in-depth dives into business ethics and corporate social responsibility, marketing, economics and global markets, and leadership with business analysis and artificial intelligence. In the last quarter of the first year, the Trinity trimester from April to August, students will take three more core modules in Operational Strategy, Professional Development, Leadership, and Climate Emergency.

The second year of the program starts with a week of immersion on campus and a business project, followed by options and an independent elective project. In the final Trinity trimester, students engage in a social enterprise and entrepreneurship project as well as a scale-up project before graduation in August. The school currently lists only six options to choose from which range from international business to cross-cultural management.

For admission, Trinity will require an Executive Assessment Test with a score of 140/200, as well as a minimum of three to five years of work experience as well as a degree, professional qualification, or history of successful completion. commercial. The school is open to EA exam waiver for applicants with eight or more years of management experience or holders of a master’s or doctoral degree in a quantitative discipline from a reputable university. Non-native English speakers must have an IELTS 6.5 or a TOEFL IBT 90.

DON’T MISS: THE WORLD’S BEST ONLINE MBA PROGRAMS OF 2021 or GIES AWAITS A NEW RECORD FOR ITS ONLINE MBA CANDIDATES



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OP-ED: Transport planning studies, yesterday, today and tomorrow https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/op-ed-transport-planning-studies-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/op-ed-transport-planning-studies-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 14:26:46 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/op-ed-transport-planning-studies-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow/ Good transportation planning can lead to more profitable capital projects and programs, as well as improved cost-effective modifications to existing services. In many cases, the Federal Transit Administration funds these studies under several programs, such as Metropolitan and State Planning and Non-Metropolitan Planning Sections 5303, 5304, and 5305. These grants can be used for funding […]]]>


Good transportation planning can lead to more profitable capital projects and programs, as well as improved cost-effective modifications to existing services.

In many cases, the Federal Transit Administration funds these studies under several programs, such as Metropolitan and State Planning and Non-Metropolitan Planning Sections 5303, 5304, and 5305. These grants can be used for funding and procedural requirements for planning multimodal transport in metropolitan areas and states.

Planning should be cooperative, continuous and comprehensive, resulting in long-term plans and short-term programs reflecting transport investment priorities. Section 5397 of the Urbanized Areas Formula provides funding to urbanized transit systems (UZA) for capital, planning, access to work and reverse commuting projects, as well as operating expenses under certain circumstances.

Let’s take a look at the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) and the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT). The MTA already has five-year long-term investment plans 2020-2024 and twenty-year 2014-2034 which are periodically updated. We are all looking forward to the new MTA 2020-2040 long-term investment plan. It was promised by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the MTA to be released by December 2019. It is now 18 months overdue.

Both documents clearly describe the capital funds required to maintain both the state of repair of existing equipment, facilities and services as well as the safety, security and future projects and expansion programs of the system. Specific costs and individual MTA operating agencies such as NYC Transit bus, Staten Island, Long Island and Metro North Railroads and Subway and Railroads and MTA bus are also identified for projects and programs.

The New York State Department of Transportation manages the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Each Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for each urbanized area, which is affiliated with NYSDOT, maintains a Local Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The New York Metropolitan Transportation Council maintains a comprehensive list of proposed transportation projects, updated annually. Both NYCDOT and MTA are involved in this process. The STIP and TIP documents contain a complete inventory of potential transport improvement projects, the respective sponsoring agency and the estimated cost. Both DFO and NYSDOT maintain five-year short-term and 20-year long-term lists of potential capital transportation improvement projects by recipient and operating agency.

Each year, millions of dollars are spent on planning studies to research the potential for new transportation capital investments and system expansion. This includes the New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s NYS Department of Transportation and NYS Empire State Development Corporation, state-sponsored metropolitan planning organizations in all major urbanized areas, including the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council which serves New York, Long Island (counties of Nassau and Suffolk) and Mid-South Hudson (Westchester, Putnam and Rockland counties); New York and New Jersey Port Authority, MTA, and every operating agency, including NYC Transit buses, Staten Island subways and railways, Long Island Rail Road, Metro North Rail Road and MTA Bus; NYC DOT of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, NYC Department of City Planning Transportation Division and NYC Economic Development Corporation, Regional Planning Association and other private entities. All periodically carry out feasibility studies on transport planning. Many of these agencies and activities benefit from both Federal Transit and / or Highway Administration funding.

Collectively, every decade, a full inventory of all of these agencies would reveal that dozens and dozens of transportation studies worth over $ 100 million have been completed. Funding for these studies comes from a variety of sources, including municipal, state and federal.

How many transit agencies, DFOs, city, county, or state transportation departments have kept and preserved copies of earlier studies dating back decades? Has anyone ever taken a full inventory of all of these studies? Have they checked the recommendations, estimated project costs, implementation schedule and identification of potential funding sources to move forward? Who verifies that a study is not simply a duplication of a previous study for the same problem?

While working at FTA Region 2, I would insist that every agency receiving funding for planning studies periodically conduct a simple analysis of all studies, whether funded locally, state, or government. federal. It is important to preserve past history so that we can learn from it, not repeat the same mistakes or pay twice for the same work. All studies under my supervision would include information listing the members of the advisory and steering committee, as well as the names of the consultant staff who managed the study. (This is more useful if one has follow-up questions months or years later.) I would also ask transit agencies to explain the result, if any, as a result of studying the years later. Have any of the following steps taken place to advance the concepts or recommendations of the study? This may include the environmental review, design and engineering, or the actual construction of a new transportation project.

The real problem is finding the money to make things happen. Too often, the funding for many studies would have been better spent on actual capital and operational service improvements rather than just lining the pockets of consultants. Too many studies end up long forgotten and accumulate dust on the shelves of transportation planners. Too often we find ourselves with a series of press conferences and press releases intended to offer free publicity to elected officials who have promoted the study to help them grease the wheels of future elections. These same elected officials promise a bright future but leave the runners with an empty bag. If properly defined and managed, good transport studies can serve as the basis for initiating profitable and well-planned future capital investments or improvements to existing transport operations.

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Larry Penner is a transportation advocate, historian, and writer who previously worked for the Federal Transit Administration’s New York Region 2 office. This included the development, review, approval and monitoring of billions of dollars in grants that helped fund capital projects and programs for the NY MTA, NYC Transit, Long Island and Metro North Rail Roads, MTA Bus, NYC DOT, NJ Transit and over 30 transit agencies in New York and New Jersey.



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Utah Athletics launches Elevate U program for student-athletes https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/utah-athletics-launches-elevate-u-program-for-student-athletes/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/utah-athletics-launches-elevate-u-program-for-student-athletes/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 17:01:01 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/utah-athletics-launches-elevate-u-program-for-student-athletes/ SALT LAKE CITY – Utah Athletics today announced the launch of the Elevate U program to equip student-athletes with the tools and education to make the most of their name, image and likeness. This innovative program, built in partnership with the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah and the Lassonde Entrepreneur […]]]>


SALT LAKE CITY – Utah Athletics today announced the launch of the Elevate U program to equip student-athletes with the tools and education to make the most of their name, image and likeness.

This innovative program, built in partnership with the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah and the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute, ranked among the top 10 nationally, builds on the student-athlete development program well Established Ute Academy to Empower, Connect, and Protect Utah Students. athletes as they build their personal brands and develop business opportunities.

“We are very excited about what we have developed for our student-athletes with the Elevate U program,” said Marc Harlan, sports director. “For several months, we have focused on the creation of this program, led by the Deputy AD & Chief Operating Officer Charmelle Green, and we are very grateful for our partnership with the David Eccles School of Business and the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute to provide our student-athletes with expertise in building and managing their brand and finding business opportunities. “

Utah’s more than 500 student-athletes across 20 athletic programs are well positioned to benefit significantly from their experience as students at one of the country’s elite academic institutions located in the dynamic market and rapidly growing Salt Lake City, capital of the US News & World Report recently named best state economy.

“We are thrilled to partner with Utah Athletics to enable student-athletes to capitalize on their incredible branding and entrepreneurial opportunity,” said Taylor Randall, Dean of the David Eccles School of Business. “The expertise of the Eccles School and the Lassonde Entrepreneurship Institute will help guide student-athletes in building their personal brand and better understand how to make the most of it.

The pillars of the Ute Academy, established in 2019, include a leadership and mentoring program, a student-to-athlete transition class, network evenings, and employer site visits. Supported by the innovation and resources of the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute, these two Elevate U anchors will allow Utah student-athletes to explore a multitude of opportunities and resources to build their brand and their future by learning to create a sustainable business; learn brand management, creative marketing, leadership and character development; and build strong and lasting personal brands.

“I am so excited about the partnership with the David Eccles School of Business and the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute,” said Green. “Combined with our existing Ute Academy programming, this collaboration has been extremely helpful in our ability to create Elevate U, a comprehensive educational program for Utah student-athletes that will allow them to capitalize on their name, their image and likeness. This partnership is essential to our success, and I am very excited about what the future holds for our student-athletes who benefit from the creation of Elevate U. “

Elevate U will also connect Utah student-athletes to help them create a thriving network to follow their passions and achieve their dreams. They will receive training on campus and community resources, get advice from Utah alumni and community members, and learn how to leverage their ideas and talents.

In addition to being empowered and connected, student-athletes will be protected by acquiring the resources and knowledge necessary to maximize their earning potential; advance their business efforts successfully through complex rules and regulations; and acquire valuable skills, including negotiation, business information management and financial literacy.

“Our student-athletes will have the opportunity in this great community to explore and benefit from sponsorship arrangements and business opportunities,” added Harlan. “We will work closely with them to educate them and give them all the tools they need to be successful in this environment and maximize all of their opportunities. To be a student-athlete in the United States is a special thing, and the opportunity now to do. part of Elevate U greatly enhances their experience in this amazing community that helps them grow as a person, as an athlete and in the development of their brand. ”

Utah student-athletes will also continue to benefit from the department-wide partnership with the INFLCR, enabling them to have innovative technologies to use the content provided through the app to enhance their personal brands on the market. social networks and to receive engagement and development action for business opportunities and evaluation.

“The collaboration between our Elevate U working group and our partners at the David Eccles School of Business and the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute has been inspiring,” added Green. “Bringing these groups together and seeing the relationships that have formed along the way has produced a powerful partnership that will stand the test of time and allow us to be successful now and in the future for our students. -athletes.

WHAT THE UTAH HEAD COACHES ARE SAYING ABOUT ELEVATE U:

Kyle Whittingham, Soccer

“The University of Utah and the Salt Lake City area is a perfect environment for our athletes to thrive in promoting their brand through name, image and likeness. With the Elevate U program, our athletes will be given the tools to be successful, and we ‘I am excited about the opportunities our athletes will have to elevate their brand and their game to prepare them for their future. “

Lynne roberts, Women’s basketball
“Elevate U is a program that makes competing at the University of Utah a personal brand advantage for our student-athletes. The access and opportunities provided to our athletes by the University of Utah and Salt Lake City will be the best in the country There is no better place to be right now than at U Elevate U will be the engine that helps get our talented student-athletes where they want to go.

Tom farden, Gymnastic
“Building a brand for yourself and starting your future is extremely valuable, and capitalizing on your name, image and likeness will provide countless opportunities for our Utah gymnasts to do so. We are delighted that our students- athletes are even presented with more opportunities to succeed during and after their varsity careers. I am more than enthusiastic about the Elevate U education program as it is the necessary stepping stone for our athletes to take full advantage of the many opportunities to come. . “

Craig smith, Men’s basketball
“This is a special time for varsity athletics. I am delighted that our student-athletes have the opportunity to monetize their name image and likeness as we move forward. Our industry is continually evolving and will always seek to improve. the whole student-athlete experience. The University of Utah and our athletic department are at the forefront in everything we do. Elevate U is another example of being at the forefront of positive change Elevate U provides our student-athletes with the leadership tools to help them grow and improve their lives.

Beth launiere, Volleyball
“The Elevate U program is another example of the great leadership of our athletics department and the University of Utah. The U is always innovative in its ways to improve the student-athlete experience and our partnership. with the David Eccles School of Business and the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute will only enrich this program. Our student-athletes are worth the investment, and Elevate U will be a great asset to the growth of our incredible student-athletes as a ‘entrepreneurs.



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Heartland Community College to sue $ 23 million farm building https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/heartland-community-college-to-sue-23-million-farm-building/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/heartland-community-college-to-sue-23-million-farm-building/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/heartland-community-college-to-sue-23-million-farm-building/ Heartland Community College is moving forward with a proposal for a $ 23.4 million farm building – the first major component of the college’s new strategic plan. Trustees approved a request for state money to pay for the nearly 30,000 square foot structure, as well as the greenhouse and hoop house. Heartland President Keith Cornille […]]]>


Heartland Community College is moving forward with a proposal for a $ 23.4 million farm building – the first major component of the college’s new strategic plan. Trustees approved a request for state money to pay for the nearly 30,000 square foot structure, as well as the greenhouse and hoop house.

Heartland President Keith Cornille said the college may choose other funding options, including a public-private partnership, fundraising or bond if state capital does not materialize. Cornille hopes funding options will be explored in late fall or early winter, which will allow administrators to decide how to proceed, adding that Heartland is considering a two-year build process.

Current enrollment in Heartland ag programs is low, around 40 students. But Cornille said agriculture-related jobs were one of the top three areas of workforce development for the region, according to an HCC study.

“Agriculture is a big part of who we are. All the metrics have shown it. There is a big need here in the Midwest, especially in precision farming, agribusiness. , general agronomy and regenerative agriculture as well, ”said Cornille. .

He said Heartland was very careful to avoid duplicating the agriculture programs at the University of Illinois and Illinois State Universities and to expand areas that can fuel Heartland students in these. programs.

Heartland is already planning to launch certificate programs during the fall semester in the various areas mentioned by Cornille. He said these would increase agriculture-related enrollment to around 200 students, and potentially many more depending on manpower needs. Other existing certificate programs could be converted to associate degree programs, including agricultural mechanics, animal science, food science and horticulture, to further stimulate enrollment.

“In 2019, Illinois had the most agriculture-related job vacancies, totaling over 4,000, compared to the rest of the United States,” according to the directors’ filing which also cited a McLean report. County Economic Development Council, rating four of the top employers. in McLean County have links to agriculture: one in manufacturing, one in chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers, the latter two in input retail, co-ops and related services.

Cornille also noted that there are still plenty of high school feeding programs in the area. Twelve of the district’s fifteen public high schools have active agriculture programs and are actively involved in the FFA National Organization, according to briefing materials for administrators.



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21st Chief Justice of the District Judicial Court addresses a group of Republican women | Livingston / Tangipahoa https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/21st-chief-justice-of-the-district-judicial-court-addresses-a-group-of-republican-women-livingston-tangipahoa/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/21st-chief-justice-of-the-district-judicial-court-addresses-a-group-of-republican-women-livingston-tangipahoa/#respond Tue, 15 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/21st-chief-justice-of-the-district-judicial-court-addresses-a-group-of-republican-women-livingston-tangipahoa/ Judge Brenda Bedsole Ricks spoke to Republican women in Livingston Parish on June 2. She was elected 24 years ago to the 21st Judicial District Court, which serves the parishes of Livingston, St Helena and Tangipahoa, and has not been opposed since then. In January, Ricks became Chief Justice, the first woman to hold the […]]]>


Judge Brenda Bedsole Ricks spoke to Republican women in Livingston Parish on June 2. She was elected 24 years ago to the 21st Judicial District Court, which serves the parishes of Livingston, St Helena and Tangipahoa, and has not been opposed since then.

In January, Ricks became Chief Justice, the first woman to hold the post.

Ricks said she sees people in the justice system who are not violent criminals but who have gone through difficult times due to mental health issues or are veterans with PTSD. These people may be homeless and end up in the system for minor offenses such as food theft.

She said she believed this population could be saved. She is considering a veterans court and a mental health court. The district attorney’s office would identify candidates for these court systems. Instead of being treated like hardened criminals, they could be assigned to a two-year program. In the program, they could benefit from housing and training in conjunction with existing programs such as Quad Vets in Hammond. If they got out of trouble, at the end of the two years, their records would be erased.

The judge has other help. Judge Brian Abels and Judge William Dykes volunteer their time, and the District Attorney supports the program. Ricks applied for grants to organize and support the programs.



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Why America Needs a Better School-Career Bridge https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/why-america-needs-a-better-school-career-bridge/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/why-america-needs-a-better-school-career-bridge/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/why-america-needs-a-better-school-career-bridge/ As the COVID-19 pandemic diminishes, America faces a crucial opportunity to close the gaps that leave many … [+] workers behind, say Joseph Fuller and Rachel Lipson. What will it take? iStockphoto / Aaron Hawkins by Joseph B. Fuller and Rachel Lipson More than a year after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are […]]]>


by Joseph B. Fuller and Rachel Lipson

More than a year after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are signs of optimism as more people gain access to vaccines and the federal government injects more stimulus money into the ‘economy. Yet the outlook for workers remains mixed. The crisis has exacerbated existing inequalities and recent job gains reflect persistent disparities based on race, gender, age and educational attainment.

Emerging from the crisis, providing more workers with pathways to economic stability will largely depend on forging stronger links between education and economic opportunity. America’s fragmented education and training systems have too often reinforced barriers between work and learning, rather than bridging the worlds of education and employment. This is an opportune time to reassess the country’s fundamental approach to human capital development.

To understand patterns and theories of change among training organizations, our Harvard Interdisciplinary Workforce Project research team analyzed 316 applications for the Postsecondary Equity Innovation Initiative. The grants competition, launched by venture philanthropy New Profit, awarded $ 100,000 to social entrepreneurs who help young people in low-income communities launch promising careers. The apps offer insight into the interaction between short-term training providers, employers, colleges and high schools.

We have found that the link between education and employment remains too tenuous in America. To create more pathways to upward mobility in the post-COVID recovery, policymakers, employers and educators need to prioritize and adapt programs that integrate work and learning. Our new White Paper Work to Learn: Despite a growing number of innovators, America struggles to connect education and career explores several important trends from our analysis:

Few programs target university and employment. While the organizations in the dataset see themselves as innovators in the combination of post-secondary credentials and work experience, they fall almost evenly between those focused on college enrollment and those offering models focused on college enrollment. the career. Only 16 percent of applicants favor relationships with educational institutions and employers. In addition, few organizations measure their success in terms of both educational attainment and labor market outcomes. For example, only 33 percent of organizations that track college-related outcomes also prioritize employment outcomes.

The opportunities for situated learning remain rare. Previous research has shown that skills learned in a setting similar to where they will be applied are much more sustainable. Yet relatively few organizations offer learning opportunities that closely resemble the realities of the workplace. Only 25 percent of applicants offer apprenticeships, internships or on-the-job training. This figure is derisory compared to other OECD countries such as Germany or Switzerland (pdf), where 40 to 70% of students divide their time between traditional school settings and learning at the workplace. .

Techniques and interpersonal skills rarely go hand in hand. The future of work, and in particular well-paying jobs, will require a combination of fundamental and transferable soft skills and job-specific technical skills. However, we found that only 9% of organizations in the dataset prioritize both types of skills. The emphasis on short-term placement should not come at the expense of developing skills, such as critical thinking, that prepare learners for long-term career success. Learning on the job, especially when paired with mentoring, can foster both skill sets.

Relations with employers tend to be lacking. Perhaps the most disturbing result of our research is that only 35% of applicants report working directly with employers. The most effective programs in the social science literature (pdf) exhibit strong relationships with employers. Organizations in our dataset that work with employers grow faster than their peers in the dataset. This offers promises for the future. But, given the gravity of the challenge of COVID re-employment, fostering links between education providers and the organizations that hire will be more essential than ever.

Establish an impact program

While many of these challenges are not new, the data strengthens the case for action. Indeed, the crisis has renewed pressure on the United States to develop new models and expand existing avenues that can open doors for those most affected by the recession. They include workers without a bachelor’s degree, workers of color, young workers, working mothers, and workers in industries most affected by COVID, such as retail and hospitality.

As we envision a post-pandemic recovery, it will be up to policymakers, business leaders and educators to ensure these groups are not left behind. The American Jobs Plan encourages significant new investments in training. Policymakers and educators should seize the opportunity to use the funding for programs that combine education and work experience, especially those where people can learn and earn money while graduating from high school or college. .

Incentives and measures will also play an important role in understanding the success of training efforts. If college-focused programs aspire to support employment outcomes, labor market outcomes must become a key indicator of success. These lessons should also apply to private funders of philanthropy.

Employers will also have a critical role to play in creating the pathways that will help workers affected by COVID withstand future economic shocks. The private sector spends most of the dollars spent on adult training.

Policy makers should support programs that actively encourage employers to invest in talent pools. CareerWise, founded in Colorado but now spanning Indiana, New York, and Washington, DC, provides a replicable model for employers to engage high school students in youth learning. And the growth of “education-as-benefit” models like Guild Education provides good evidence of the potential of employers to integrate access to post-secondary education more directly into their human capital strategies. Efforts such as the U.S. Workers’ Investment Act, which would revise the tax code so that business investments in their workforce are treated the same as investments in physical assets and research, are also a good step forward.

Additionally, as more data emerges from this crisis, we expect to see greater opportunities for workers with transferable soft skills in the wake of increasing automation. Employers and educators will need to focus on how they can cultivate these skills in workers and learners.

Finally, any systemic solution must meet the challenges of market fragmentation. There is no “one stop shop” for employers and potential employees to find each other, even when labor markets are tight. But as hiring increases, closer ties between educational institutions and industry can produce better economic outcomes for workers and higher levels of competitiveness for U.S. employers. Achieving this requires lifelong workplace learning programs that support educator degree programs and employer hiring strategies. Closing the gaps and reducing the friction between completing school and starting a job offers significant returns for workers, employers and society as a whole.

Joseph B. Fuller is professor of management practices at Harvard Business School. He co-chairs the HBS Project on Managing the Future of Work and the Workforce Project at Harvard. Rachel Lipson is the director of the Workforce Project at Harvard University.



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Westmoreland County Launches Clean Energy Program for Real Estate Development https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/westmoreland-county-launches-clean-energy-program-for-real-estate-development/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/westmoreland-county-launches-clean-energy-program-for-real-estate-development/#respond Sun, 13 Jun 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/westmoreland-county-launches-clean-energy-program-for-real-estate-development/ Westmoreland County Commissioners have created a program that officials say will help private businesses and industrial building owners borrow money to pay for energy conservation programs. The Countywide Property Assessed Clean Energy program, launched by the state in 2018, allows the county to act as an intermediary for private owners to borrow and repay loans […]]]>


Westmoreland County Commissioners have created a program that officials say will help private businesses and industrial building owners borrow money to pay for energy conservation programs.

The Countywide Property Assessed Clean Energy program, launched by the state in 2018, allows the county to act as an intermediary for private owners to borrow and repay loans taken out specifically for the purchase of energy efficient and clean equipment.

“We expect it to breathe new life into older buildings as they are modernized into efficient and desirable workplaces. This will increase property values ​​and help make Westmoreland an even better place to do business, ”said Commissioner Sean Kertes.

The program is not available for residential properties.

It makes it easier for building owners of existing or new commercial, industrial and agricultural properties to access low-interest, long-term private loans for projects such as whole building insulation, installation of geothermal heating and cooling systems and energy efficient lighting, according to county planning. director Jason Rigone.

These improvements are expected to result in energy savings for building owners, he said.

Rigone said the program will make these private loans easier to obtain. Loan repayments will be collected by the county treasurer’s office who, in turn, will reimburse private financial institutions.

County involvement means energy project loans could be tied to buildings rather than the entity securing the funds.

“It’s an opportunity to access new resources to make energy improvements,” Rigone said.

Westmoreland will be the 14th county to adopt the program, joining Allegheny, Erie and Washington in western Pennsylvania.

The commissioners appointed the PP&L Sustainable Energy Fund to administer the program. This agency will be paid through fees assessed to private owners.

“Not only does this help landowners fund improvements, it also benefits our communities by ensuring that existing properties, including those that are vacant or run down, are transformed into modern workplaces. In addition, it will stimulate economic activity through renovation and construction works, ”said Commissioner Doug Chew.

Commissioner Gina Cerilli Thrasher said the program will bring long-term benefits to the community.

“We’re helping homeowners make investments that they might not otherwise have been able to fund,” Thrasher said.

Rich Cholodofsky is an editor for Tribune-Review. You can contact Rich at 724-830-6293, rcholodofsky@triblive.com or via Twitter .





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New York’s affordable $ 15 internet bill goes into limbo https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-yorks-affordable-15-internet-bill-goes-into-limbo/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-yorks-affordable-15-internet-bill-goes-into-limbo/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 21:14:34 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-yorks-affordable-15-internet-bill-goes-into-limbo/ Internet access is, according to New York Eastern District Judge Dennis R. Hurley, a “modern necessity.” Sadly, Justice Hurley wrote those words in an injunction, filed today, to block a progressive bill that would have made affordable internet availability mandatory for everyone in New York state – and which would have come into force at […]]]>


Internet access is, according to New York Eastern District Judge Dennis R. Hurley, a “modern necessity.” Sadly, Justice Hurley wrote those words in an injunction, filed today, to block a progressive bill that would have made affordable internet availability mandatory for everyone in New York state – and which would have come into force at the beginning of next week.

The bill, known as the Affordable Broadband Act, would have required ISPs serving more than 20,000 homes to offer two low-cost plans: one offering speeds of 25 Mbps for a maximum of $ 15 per month. , and another offering 200 Mbps for no more than $ 20 per month. It was passed by the state legislature and signed by Governor Cuomo in April, and is said to have come into effect on June 16.

According to State Assembly Member Amy Paulin, the average monthly cost of Internet access for New Yorkers is $ 50; in general, Americans can pay about double what Europeans do for broadband access.

Of course, as soon as the bill was signed, the telecommunications lobbies took legal action to prevent its passage. According to AxesNew York Governor Cuomo said the lawsuit was “nothing more than a transparent attempt by billion-dollar companies to put profit ahead of creating a fairer and more just society.” And, love or hate the guy, he’s right.

The ABA is not dead in the water, but Judge Hurley’s eleventh hour injunction does not bode well. In its determination, it concluded that its enactment is likely to cause “irreparable harm” to telecommunications companies – either because they face civil penalties for not having met the requirements of the ABA, or because they charge less for the services – among other basic findings that led to the conclusion that the injunction was valid.

One particularly interesting arrow in Judge Hurley’s quiver, however, was to arm other existing programs that help make internet access affordable, particularly the FCC’s Emergency Broadband Benefit:

While the stated goal of the ABA is to expand broadband Internet access, that doesn’t mean it’s the only legislative effort to do so. Complainants discuss multiple federal programs allocating billions of dollars to achieve same goal […] While the defendant argues that the New York legislature determined that these federal benefits were insufficient, that decision was made before the FCC announced on April 29, 2021 that the emergency broadband benefit would come into effect on May 12, 2021.

Broadband emergency delivery is very different from ABA in several ways. It does not in any way cap the cost of Internet access and, unlike ABA, it is means-tested: applicants must qualify by demonstrating that they meet specific economic criteria. Those who do can receive $ 50 off their monthly bill.

So: for now, like the ABA itself, New Yorkers who hoped for reliable broadband at a reasonable price are stuck in limbo. While the injunction casts a big shadow over the future of the law, it is, at the end of the day, essentially a judge saying “listen, I need more time to sort this out” . Hopefully, with a little thought, New York can still make a hole in the almost comically consolidated telecommunications sector.



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State “Roadmaps for Resilience and Rural Recovery” program arrives in northeast Colorado – Sterling Journal-Advocate https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/state-roadmaps-for-resilience-and-rural-recovery-program-arrives-in-northeast-colorado-sterling-journal-advocate/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/state-roadmaps-for-resilience-and-rural-recovery-program-arrives-in-northeast-colorado-sterling-journal-advocate/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 01:42:13 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/state-roadmaps-for-resilience-and-rural-recovery-program-arrives-in-northeast-colorado-sterling-journal-advocate/ Logan County is one of 16 regional teams to secure funding to help recover from the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade (OEDIT) and the Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) announced Thursday the 16 regional teams participating in the Colorado Rural Resiliency and Recovery Roadmap […]]]>


Logan County is one of 16 regional teams to secure funding to help recover from the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade (OEDIT) and the Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) announced Thursday the 16 regional teams participating in the Colorado Rural Resiliency and Recovery Roadmap program. The 16 teams represent 169 rural Colorado communities, the announcement notes.

The Roadmap program will provide each team with technical assistance “to communities to drive long-term economic relief, recovery, diversification and resilience,” the announcement said. Funding for the program comes from a $ 2.3 million grant from the US Economic Development Administration and $ 869,723 from the government. According to the announcement, it is expected to create more than 100 jobs and up to $ 50 million in private investment.

The Morgan County team, so named because Morgan County is the lead applicant, includes: Morgan County, Logan County, Yuma County, Washington County, Sedgwick County, County of Phillips, Town of Fort Morgan, Town of Brush !, Town of Sterling, Town of Holyoke, Town of Haxtun, Town of Wray, Town of Akron, Town of Otis, Morgan County Economic Development, Logan County Economic Development, Phillips County Economic Development, Sedgwick County Economic Development, Yuma County Economic Development, Fort Morgan Chamber of Commerce, Logan County Chamber, Holyoke Chamber of Commerce, Haxtun Chamber of Commerce, Wray Chamber of Commerce, Yuma Chamber of Commerce, Eastern Colorado Workforce Center, Fort Morgan School District, Brush School District, Haxtun School District, Holyoke School District, Idalia School District, Wray School District, Liberty School District, Northeastern Ju nior College, Haxtun Health, Melissa Memorial Hospital, Wray Hospital & Clinic, Centennial Mental Health, Northeast Col Orado Health Department.

Trae Miller, executive director of Logan County Economic Development Corp., said economic developers in northeast Colorado had collaborated to apply for the technical assistance grant.

“The regional partners really stepped up to make sure the demand was met on time and competitively for all of our communities,” he said.

Miller hopes that by completing the program, northeast Colorado will be in a better position to seek other sources of implementation funding in the near future.

“This is a great opportunity for our NECO region to work with the state to identify strategic efforts to move forward economically,” Miller said. “Like many of these programs, we get what we put into them. Fortunately, NECO has many partner organizations that have supported this bid and will work with us to ensure we have broad representation and community perspectives. “

The program consists of three stages, a partnership between OEDIT, DOLA, the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment and the nonprofit Community Builders:

  • curriculum to connect the regional team and assess the current situation of the communities
  • roadmap planning and strategy
  • implementation matchmaking

“We are delighted to have identified the 16 regional teams and to start working with them,” said Katharina Papenbrock, Deputy Director of Rural Opportunities at OEDIT. “The economic impact of COVID-19 has been particularly felt in rural Colorado communities, where it has exacerbated existing challenges for key industries, businesses and the local workforce. This grant allows us to match our rural communities with the right resources and programs within OEDIT and our partners so that they can advance and achieve their short and long term economic resilience strategies.

“The Roadmap program comes at a time when our local governments need to quickly recover from the impacts of COVID-19. The pandemic has shown that we can govern and do business in a new way. These roadmaps will help ensure regional, strategic and effective coordination to maximize the once-in-a-lifetime stimulus dollars that flow into Colorado communities, ”said Chantal Unfug, director of the local government division at DOLA.



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New initiative designed to remove barriers so food businesses can grow https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-initiative-designed-to-remove-barriers-so-food-businesses-can-grow/ https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-initiative-designed-to-remove-barriers-so-food-businesses-can-grow/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 04:12:05 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-initiative-designed-to-remove-barriers-so-food-businesses-can-grow/ Editor’s Note: This story is part of Southwest Michigan Second Wave’s On the Ground Battle Creek series. The first thing that most people think of when they think of Battle Creek is the grain company founded by WK (William Keith) Kellogg in 1906. The company named after Battle Creek has earned the title of “City […]]]>


Editor’s Note: This story is part of Southwest Michigan Second Wave’s On the Ground Battle Creek series.

The first thing that most people think of when they think of Battle Creek is the grain company founded by WK (William Keith) Kellogg in 1906.

The company named after Battle Creek has earned the title of “City of Grain” and made the city a leader in food science and innovation.

Efforts are currently underway to capitalize on this leadership position with a new initiative called Battle Creek Food Reimagined which is led by organizations such as the Town of Battle Creek, JPG Resources, Kellogg Community College, Michigan State University and Battle Creek Unlimited. .

Shabaka Gibson, Vice President of Retention and Workforce Development at BCU.At the end of May, representatives of these organizations had a virtual meeting with representatives of a number of state and national organizations, including the US Economic Development Administration, the US Department of Agriculture and the Michigan Economic Development Corp., to discuss resources and opportunities that have the potential to stimulate the future growth of the local food industry.

“Battle Creek Food Reimagined is our attempt to revitalize food entrepreneurship and innovation in Battle Creek,” said Shabaka Gibson, vice president of workforce retention and development at BCU. “The purpose of the meeting was to educate both sides to tell them what we are planning and for them to tell us what programs they have that match what we are trying to do. So when we’re ready we’ll know who to call.

The overall goal is to bring in additional resources to build on what Battle Creek already has in place and to further support existing technical expertise, says Ted Dearing, Deputy City Manager of Battle Creek.

“Some of these agencies may have funds available for particular programs. That’s good, but we need to know what to do to access those funds, ”he said. “It’s hard to know when we can get these resources because we don’t know which programs will work. We need to determine what programs and opportunities might be suitable. “

Ted cheringDearing says the US Economic Development Administration regularly hosts summits like the most recent at Battle Creek in communities across the country.

“The EDA holds these federal meetings across the country and there are usually six a year. I think it was a pretty unique opportunity to bring all of these federal agencies together in one room at a time to talk about Battle Creek, ”he says. “We recognize that we don’t have the resources on our own to go it alone. It was an opportunity to present what we have to federal and state agencies to talk about partnerships to build on what we already have here. This puts us in front of these agencies that work in the food space or finance economic development initiatives. “

Gibson says Battle Creek is already well positioned to capitalize on state and federal resources that may become available. But he also says it’s important to reiterate that the Battle Creek Food Reimagined initiative is still in the strategic development phase and the first thing to do is to identify and attract resources into the community.

“We have the talent, history and culture of the food industry here and when you put it all together, those are assets that other communities would love to have,” he says.

Building on history

Dearing says Battle Creek has a long heritage of food innovation dating back to the early days when the town’s complement of grain companies expanded to include Post and Ralston.

“We are looking for ways to leverage what we have in the community and our core skills. We want to improve our current image in Battle Creek as a food community with progressive and vibrant food companies investing in the industry today, ”said Dearing. “Battle Creek has strengths, resources and expertise you can’t really find anywhere else in the country to help young food companies move forward. “

Battle Creek Food Reimagined will focus its efforts on food companies ready to accelerate their existing businesses and help them remove barriers that prevent them from clearing barriers to regional or national distribution of their products, Dearing said.

At the same time, efforts are underway to develop physical spaces and have food equipment that will allow companies to develop their activity. The group is also looking to provide resources that businesses looking to locate in Battle Creek may need, including a runaway spouses program and access to potential capital.

“The idea is to attract these young companies to come here and who knows, they could be the next Kellogg’s,” says Dearing. “We are trying to build a complete food ecosystem to support the development of companies by giving them access to a community of experts like WKKI and JPG Resources“says Dearing.” We also have a physical facility like the Accelerator at the Tiger Room where we could actually grow them. In the future, we envision a much larger center for food related activities.

To do this, “We need access to key resources, technical expertise, innovation centers like WKKI (WK Kellogg Institute for Food and Nutrition Research), access to training, capital and workforce training and education, ”says Dearing.

KCC and MSU will play a major role in the workforce for the BC Food Reimagined initiative, said Tonya Forbes, Dean of Arts and Sciences at KCC.

In preparation for the meeting, MSU officials identified areas where staff would be needed and training opportunities available to them. Forbes says areas of training need included retail food distribution that aligned with basic customer service and training on specific equipment for food processing operations.

As a group, the members of Battle Creek Food Reimagined identified some priority areas and workforce development was one of them.

“Part of it is about making sure we have a trained and properly skilled workforce to support any industry,” says Forbes.

During the May meeting, she discussed how KCC and MSU can meet anticipated workforce needs through personalized training.

“Literally, when an employer comes to us and tells us they need employees to acquire this skill set, we can design a program for them for college credit or as a training opportunity,” Forbes explains. “We can also provide industry certifications such as OSHA (Occupational Health and Safety Administration) or Microsoft Office and offer credential diploma and certification programs. For this initiative there are existing programs, but it is likely that we will develop new food specific certification programs.

Building the talent base to support future growth in the number of food-related businesses and services that choose to locate in Battle Creek will provide opportunities for KCC and MSU to not only provide workforce development. ‘work and talent, but also business development for entrepreneurs, Gibson said. This includes food businesses that provide services to other food businesses.

“The trick is to have no limits and say we’re going to just focus on these foods or foods,” he says. “We need to pay attention to what’s going on in the food industry like vegetable protein or alternative meats and where the new jobs and ideas are and focus on the strengths that will lead there. We need to maintain a broad focus and get ahead of the direction the markets are going. “



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