Health Department – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:36:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Health Department – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 IF YOU RECEIVED A MAIL FROM THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH WITH THE PHRASE “PRENATAL SCREENING PROGRAM” IN AN ENVELOPE WITH A PLASTIC WINDOW FROM 07/16/2015 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/if-you-received-a-mail-from-the-california-department-of-public-health-with-the-phrase-prenatal-screening-program-in-an-envelope-with-a-plastic-window-from-07-16-2015/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:36:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/if-you-received-a-mail-from-the-california-department-of-public-health-with-the-phrase-prenatal-screening-program-in-an-envelope-with-a-plastic-window-from-07-16-2015/ Advertised by CPT Group, Inc. IRVINE, Calif., November 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — CPT Group, Inc. Announces Currently Pending Certified Class Action Called JOHNNAE M. HARKEY-KIRK vs. CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Sacramento Superior Court Case No. 34-2019-00260616 (the “Action”). What does it talk about? Plaintiff alleges that Defendant disclosed sensitive and private personal medical information […]]]>

Advertised by CPT Group, Inc.

IRVINE, Calif., November 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — CPT Group, Inc. Announces Currently Pending Certified Class Action Called JOHNNAE M. HARKEY-KIRK vs. CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Sacramento Superior Court Case No. 34-2019-00260616 (the “Action”).

What does it talk about? Plaintiff alleges that Defendant disclosed sensitive and private personal medical information regarding the pregnancy of Plaintiff and Class Members specifically by sending correspondence in an envelope with a plastic window large enough to display the name and address of the recipient, along with the sender’s name, Prenatal Screening Program and address in the upper left corner. Plaintiff further alleges that Defendants’ conduct violated Article 56 of the Civil Code (Medical Information Privacy Act “CMIA”). Defendant denies any liability for Plaintiff’s CMIA cause of action.

Who is affected? All persons enrolled as patients in Defendant’s prenatal screening program who received U.S. mail from Defendant’s California Department of Public Health with a pilot address containing the phrase “Prenatal Screening Program” in an envelope with a plastic window at all times of July 16, 2015 as of July 16, 2019 (the “Group”).

What are the options? You can do nothing and remain a member of the class or opt out.

Do not do anything: If you meet the definition of the group, you will automatically be included in the group unless you choose to exclude yourself from the group according to the procedures described below. If you want to stay in the class, you don’t have to do anything at the moment.

Exclude yourself: If you do not wish to participate in this trial, you can exclude yourself by “opting out”. By choosing to opt out of this litigation, you will not benefit from any judgment or settlement in this class action, and you will not be bound by any decision in this lawsuit favorable to the defendant. You must complete and submit an “Exclusion Request” form available at www.pregnancyscreeningprivacylawsuit.com or by mailing your request to the notice administrator by January 25, 2023.

For more details about your rights and options and how to opt out or object, go to www.pregnancyscreeningprivacylawsuit.com.

How can I get more information? For more information and to view the full review, please visit www.pregnancyscreeningprivacylawsuit.comor contact the Notice Administrator by calling toll-free 1-(833) 874-0823.

PLEASE DO NOT COMMUNICATE WITH THE COURT OR REGISTRAR

SOURCE CPT Group, Inc.

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Port Arthur Department of Health Director to speak on COVID, HIV and monkeypox – Port Arthur News https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/port-arthur-department-of-health-director-to-speak-on-covid-hiv-and-monkeypox-port-arthur-news/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 06:25:17 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/port-arthur-department-of-health-director-to-speak-on-covid-hiv-and-monkeypox-port-arthur-news/ Director of Port Arthur Health Department to speak on COVID, HIV and monkeypox Posted at 12:24 a.m. on Wednesday, November 16, 2022 There will be a number of speakers who are subject matter experts on various topics. (Courtesy picture) BEAUMONT — An information seminar on several diseases is scheduled for Thursday in Beaumont and will […]]]>

Director of Port Arthur Health Department to speak on COVID, HIV and monkeypox

Posted at 12:24 a.m. on Wednesday, November 16, 2022

BEAUMONT — An information seminar on several diseases is scheduled for Thursday in Beaumont and will also be broadcast on Zoom.

The seminar, titled Building Resilience at the Intersection of COVID-19, HCV, HIV, and Monkeypox, will run from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 3040 College St. in Beaumont.

For more information on registration, call the health department at 409-983-8874.

Judith Smith, Director of Port Arthur City Health Department, will host, introduce the first speaker and also explain how public health has responded to COVID-19.

There will be a number of speakers who are subject matter experts on various topics.

“Several different speakers will be there to expound on each one,” Smith said.

“HIV has been in the community since the 1990s, and when people go to the health department clinic to be tested for sexually transmitted diseases, they are also tested for HIV.

Smith said the seminar is a way to raise awareness of old infections that have been around for some time, as well as ones that are spreading just recently.

There have been no confirmed cases of Monkey Pox in Port Arthur, although Beaumont has had a few confirmed cases.

Cheryl Gibbs, the city’s public information officer, emphasized the importance of the seminar.

“With the impact of these diseases directly affecting our families and friends, this seminar, which provides hours of continuing education for healthcare professionals and valuable explanations for citizens, promises to provide much-needed health and safety information. of our communities,” according to city news.

The Gilead organization has partnered with the city’s health department and other health care organizations to provide education about Jefferson County‘s most trying illnesses.

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Activists call for mental health crisis unit in wake of deadly Detroit police shooting https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/activists-call-for-mental-health-crisis-unit-in-wake-of-deadly-detroit-police-shooting/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 00:01:02 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/activists-call-for-mental-health-crisis-unit-in-wake-of-deadly-detroit-police-shooting/ Detroit — Local activists are calling for the creation of an independent mental health crisis response team following the Fatal shooting by Porter Burks police a little over a month ago. About 30 people attended Saturday’s rally at the Adams Butzel Recreation Center despite snow, sleet and 35-degree temperatures. It was organized by the Detroit […]]]>

Detroit — Local activists are calling for the creation of an independent mental health crisis response team following the Fatal shooting by Porter Burks police a little over a month ago.

About 30 people attended Saturday’s rally at the Adams Butzel Recreation Center despite snow, sleet and 35-degree temperatures.

It was organized by the Detroit Justice Center, a nonprofit law firm, community organizing groups like We the People MI Action Fund, Michigan Liberation, and Accountability for Dearborn, a group that demands transparency and eventually the Dearborn Police Divestment.

Ash Daniels, lead organizer for Michigan Liberation’s Care Not Criminalization campaign, said the state lacks adequate mental health facilities to provide care to those in need, and that black and brown communities are disproportionately affected by the lack of resources, she said.

“We need facilities where people can go and numbers outside of the police when people are in crisis,” Daniels said. “When the police show up in uniform, the person in crisis usually tends to become more aggressive. And as we’ve seen over the past month, the results don’t bode well.”

In October, Detroit police officers shot Burks, 22, 38 times in three seconds as he clutched a knife and refused to obey the officer’s orders to drop him. Burks’ family had initially called the police because he was having a mental health crisis.

Burks’ family has filed a $50 million wrongful death lawsuit against the city of Detroit and the five unnamed police officers who shot him earlier this month. The officers were placed on administrative leave following the shooting, in accordance with Detroit police policy.

A police investigation into Burks’ past revealed that he had a history of run-ins with the police. More recently, his family called the police in June to report that Burks was looking to fight anyone. Prior to this, police were called after Burks stabbed two family members in March and August 2020.

Detroit Police Chief James White previously said that the system “failed Mr. Burks” and his familywho tried to get him to help.

Maranda Sailor, 23, said she wanted to show her support at the rally as she said police were called to her amid a mental health crisis when she was 20.

“It was really scary when I saw the police come in instead of a doctor,” Sailor said. “A crazy amount of stuff that I could have avoided if someone came to talk to me and calm me down.”

Detroit police respond to more than three times as many 911 calls related to mental health as they did in 2020, averaging 64 per day.

Daniels said that since mental health-related 911 calls are becoming more frequent, part of the police department’s budget should be allocated to an independent crisis unit.

“It only takes about 2% of DPD’s budget to start and fully fund a non-police crisis unit,” Daniels said. “More people (need) to go into social work and psychiatry, and, you know, be prepared to show up for those calls and answer the phone.”

Alexandria Hughes, leader of Accountability for Dearborn, said first responders in mental health crisis situations should not carry guns.

She cited the Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets (CAHOOTS) program in Eugene, Oregon, and the Support Team Assisted Response (STAR) program in Denver, Colorado, as examples Michigan cities could emulate.

A gun does not signal that the next response will be healing. A gun signals that the next response will be violence,” she said. “It is fundamental for a person in charge of the intervention in the event of a mental health crisis to ask the person what they need, to ask them questions about their autonomy.

Detroit police started expanding their mental health co-response partnership in March. The initiative aims to treat Detroiters with mental health issues instead of sending them to jail and to train officers in de-escalation situations with people with mental health issues.

A crisis response officer is seen in body camera footage of Burks’ shooting saying, “You have no problem, just drop the knife and we’ll help you.”

On Thursday, Detroit police fatally shot and killed a mother of two who also suffered from mental illness. The woman’s mother called the police after assaulting herself and her 7-year-old son and informed them over the phone that her daughter had schizophrenia.

The woman was shot dead by police as she struggled with an officer to access a gun. The shooting is still under investigation, but police say the safety of the children at home at the time of the shooting was their primary concern.

Detroit City Council President Mary Sheffield said she is ready to explore all options when it comes to finding non-lethal methods to treat residents with mental illnesses.

“That said, protecting the lives of everyone involved, the person in need of assistance, family members, neighbors and police, should be the goal,” Sheffield wrote in an email.

hmackay@detroitnews.com

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Delaware County Memorial Hospital Emergency Department Closing https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/delaware-county-memorial-hospital-emergency-department-closing/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 11:09:16 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/delaware-county-memorial-hospital-emergency-department-closing/ DREXEL HILL, Pa. (WPVI) — The Pennsylvania Department of Health is suspending emergency operations at Delaware County Memorial Hospital beginning at 7 a.m. Monday. “You are hereby notified that the Pennsylvania Department of Health (department) is issuing an order against Prospect DCMH, LLC d/b/a Delaware County Memorial Hospital (facility) suspending emergency department services and imposing […]]]>

DREXEL HILL, Pa. (WPVI) — The Pennsylvania Department of Health is suspending emergency operations at Delaware County Memorial Hospital beginning at 7 a.m. Monday.

“You are hereby notified that the Pennsylvania Department of Health (department) is issuing an order against Prospect DCMH, LLC d/b/a Delaware County Memorial Hospital (facility) suspending emergency department services and imposing a ban of admission to the facility effective Monday, November 7, 2022 at 7:00 a.m.,” reads the department’s order.

Delaware County officials say this is due to a lack of adequate staffing at the hospital.

The county lashed out at the hospital’s current owner, Prospect Medical Holdings, the parent company of Crozer Health, saying it “shows a gross lack of concern for the well-being of Delaware County residents.”

The health department said it was warranted due to “serious violations”.

In its order, the health department said the company did not “provide diagnostic imaging coverage for the hospital, including the emergency department.”

Last month, a judge granted a temporary injunction preventing the closure of Drexel Hill Hospital and its transformation into a behavioral health facility.

The Department of Health issued the order on Friday evening.

The state health department said: “The suspension of emergency services and the barring of admissions will be in place until the department determines that there is no longer a significant threat to the patient health or safety.The establishment may not represent itself to the public as being able to provide these services while the ban and suspension are in effect.However, the establishment must be prepared to put in place essential life-saving measures in accordance with 28 Pa. Code 117.1(a) and to transfer patients requiring emergency services or hospital admission if necessary.”

Crozer Health released a statement, saying it had notified its other medical facilities of the closure.

“Crozer Health has received an order from the PA Ministry of Health advising us that due to staffing issues, we must close the Emergency Department at Delaware County Memorial Hospital until further notice, beginning at 7:00 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 7. We have alerted emergency departments and nearby emergency departments, including our Taylor Hospital and Crozer-Chester Medical Center, who are ready to receive patients,” Crozer Health said.

In its full statement, Delaware County says it is exploring all legal options to try to keep the hospital open.

“The Pennsylvania Department of Health’s decision to suspend operations at Delaware County Memorial Hospital is a direct result of Prospect’s inability to adequately staff Delaware County Memorial Hospital. Prospect’s recent history, including including its Sept. 21 announcement of its intention to close DCMH within 60 days, shows a flagrant lack of concern for the well-being of Delaware County residents.The county is exploring all of our legal options to try to keep DCMH open. the county said.

Copyright © 2022 WPVI-TV. All rights reserved.

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Governor Glenn Youngkin | Governor.Virginia.gov https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/governor-glenn-youngkin-governor-virginia-gov/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 23:44:33 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/governor-glenn-youngkin-governor-virginia-gov/ RICHMOND, Virginia – Governor Glenn Youngkin today announced additional appointments to the administration and board of directors. “Today I welcome this group of people to serve in my administration and on various boards of directors across Virginia,” said Governor Glenn Youngkin. “I look forward to their Commonwealth service.” ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS Martin Brown, Director of Diversity, […]]]>

RICHMOND, Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin today announced additional appointments to the administration and board of directors.

“Today I welcome this group of people to serve in my administration and on various boards of directors across Virginia,” said Governor Glenn Youngkin. “I look forward to their Commonwealth service.”

ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS

  • Martin Brown, Director of Diversity, Opportunity and Inclusion

Martin Brown comes to the Governor’s Office with a unique portfolio of public policy and management experience in both state government and private practice. As Commissioner of the Department of Human Services, Martin focused on improving the delivery of benefits and services to Virginia families, with an emphasis on adoption successes and foster care benefits. to more than one million Virginians. He also served as Special Advisor to Governor McDonnell for State Offender Rehabilitation, implementing a statewide program to facilitate job training and provide family and parenting relationship tools to reduce recidivism and provide support to children of incarcerated parents. The program became a best practice model extended statewide by the Department of Corrections. A graduate of Howard University, Martin previously served as a Visiting Scholar at the Heritage Foundation, a founding board member of the Gloucester Institute, and a member of the City of Richmond Health Department Advisory Task Force.

  • Cheryl Roberts, Director, Department of Medical Assistance Services

A seasoned head of Virginia’s Department of Medical Assistance Services, Cheryl takes the reins of the organization with a focus on improving access and stable delivery of health care for two million Virginians. As a recognized national leader in the state’s Medicaid service delivery, Cheryl provided direct oversight and leadership of the managed care program, which provides maternal and child services, oral health services and planning. strategy for emerging health issues. Prior to joining state government, Cheryl was Chief Operating Officer of the Virginia Chartered Health Plan and Assistant Vice President of Emlem Health Inc. Cheryl received her law degree from Rutgers Law School and has lived in Virginia since over twenty years.

GOVERNOR’S OFFICE

  • Christian Sansovich, Transformation Analyst

TRADE AND TRADE

  • Joseph Benevento, Assistant Secretary for Commerce and Trade
  • Willis Morris, Director, Small Business and Supplier Diversity

HEALTH AND HUMAN RESOURCES

WORK

  • david johnson, Deputy Commissioner, Ministry of Labor and Industry

PUBLIC SECURITY AND HOMELAND SECURITY

  • Nicholas Nanna,Deputy Director, Department of Fire Programs

BOARD APPOINTMENTS

ADMINISTRATION

ART AND ARCHITECTURE REVIEW COMMITTEE

  • Anne W. Smith ohf Midlothian

CYBERSECURITY PLANNING COMMITTEE

  • Aliscia N. Andrews d’Aldie, Undersecretary of Homeland Security, Office of the Governor
  • Robbie Coats de Chesterfield, Director, Grant Management and Collection, VDEM
  • Adrian Compton d’Altavista, Tribal Administrator, Monegasque Indian Nation
  • Charles DeKeyser de Powhatan, Major, Virginia National Guard
  • Michael Dent of Fairfax County, Director of Information Security, Fairfax County Department of Information Technology
  • Brenna R. Doherty de Richmond, Director of Information Security, Department of Legislative Automated Systems, Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Captain Eric W. Gowin of Amelia, Division Commander – Information Technology Division, Virginia State Police
  • John Harrisson of Roanoke County, CIO, Franklin County
  • Derek M. Kestner of New Kent County, Chief Information Security Officer, Supreme Court of Virginia
  • Benjamin Shumaker d’Aylett, Cybersecurity Specialist, King William County Government
  • Beth Burgin Waller de Roanoke, President, Cybersecurity and Data Privacy Practice, Woods Rogers Vandeventer Black
  • Michael Watson de Chesterfield, Director of Information Security, Virginia Information Technologies Agency
  • wesley williams de Roanoke, Executive Director of Technology, Roanoke City Public Schools
  • Stephanie Williams-Hayes of Chesterfield County, Director of Information Security, Virginia Department of Health

AUTHORITY

OPIOID REDUCTION AUTHORITY

  • Michel Tillem by Henrico, Founder and Executive Director, Journey House Foundation, Inc.

VIRGINIA SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT AND ENERGY STORAGE AUTHORITY

  • Michael J. Walsh, Jr., of Arlington, private law firm

TRADE AND TRADE

COAL EXAMINATION COMMITTEE OF EXAMINERS

  • Marc McCoy of Coeburn, Underground Electrician, Alpha Metallurgical DM41

CLEAN ENERGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  • Douglas E. Lamb of Henrico, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP

VIRGINIA OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

  • Brian Stephens of Norfolk, President and CEO, Hampton Roads Chamber

EDUCATION

VIRGINIA AMERICAN REVOLUTION 250 COMMITTEE

  • Jean-Ann Bolling from Mechanicsville

VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS BOARD OF TRUSTEES

  • Kirsti Goodwin de Richmond, Managing Director, Tower 3 Investments, LLC
  • Marianne Littel from Virginia Beach, interior designer

VIRGINIA COMMISSION ON HIGHER EDUCATION BOARD APPOINTMENTS

  • Elizabeth R. Cline of Fincastle, solicitor, Moss & Rocovich, solicitors, PC
  • Paul Clinton Harris, Sr., de Richmond, Executive Vice President, Huntington Ingalls Industries

HEALTH AND HUMAN RESOURCES

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  • Brian Hanrahan, MD, from Midlothian, System Medical Director, TeamHealth

AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY COMMITTEE

  • Dr. Melissa McNichol of Charlottesville, Audiologist
  • Dr Bethany Rose from Richmond, Audiologist

HEALTH PROFESSIONS COUNCIL

  • Rebecca Duff de Roanoke, Assistant Professor and Program Director, Radford University Carilion
  • S. Jonathan Hines de Staunton, Assistant Manager/FSL/CCO, Coffman Funeral Home and Crematory
  • Karen Kimsey of Hannover, Partner, Speire Healthcare Strategies
  • Laura Vencill, MS, CCC-SLP of Lebanon, Speech Language Pathologist, Russell County Public Schools

NURSING COUNCIL

  • Paul F. Hogan de Reston, economist

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE FAMILY AND CHILDREN’S TRUST FUND

  • Dr Tyler Hart de Chesterfield, President and CEO, CA Human Services
  • Roberts of the season of Virginia Beach, Principal/Director of Client Communications, Agence Charrette
  • Sweetheart Shorts from Alexandria
  • Abigail Westcott de Richmond, Director of Stakeholder Relations, Virginia Economic Development

COMMONWEALTH COUNCIL ON AGING

  • Andrea Buck, MD, JD, by Glen Allen, former member of the US Senate Special Committee on Aging

RARE DISEASES ADVICE

  • Greg Joseph of Ashburn, a patient with a rare disease
  • Elissa Pierson from Virginia Beach, caregiver
  • Elizabeth Scott of Spotsylvania, mother and caregiver

STATE CHILD DEATH REVIEW TEAM

  • Kimberly Ayers, MA, of Wytheville, Director, Wythe County Department of Social Services
  • André Beaulieu of Hanover, Lieutenant, Hanover County Fire & EMS
  • Joshua Easter, MD, MSc, of Charlottesville, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia
  • The Honorable Susan O’Prandy Fierro of Prince George, Commonwealth Attorney for Prince George’s County
  • Ryan Hilbish of Bedford, Lieutenant, Bedford County Sheriff‘s Office
  • Jonathan Minter of Hanover County, Lt., Hanover County Fire and EMS

WORK

APPRENTICESHIP COUNCIL

  • Grant Shmelzer of Bethesda, MD, CEO, Independent Electrical Contractors Chesapeake

ADVICE FOR ENTREPRENEURS

  • Taylor Brannan of Richmond, Vice President, F. Richard Wilton Jr., Inc.

COMMUNITY COUNCIL OF COMMON INTEREST

  • Thomas A. Mazzei of Fairfax County, CEO, Cardinal Management Group, Inc.
  • Margaret “Meg” Tunstall de Henrico, Director of Operations and Systems, HHHunt Communities

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE

  • Owen Roy Morgan of Alexandria, Government Relations Manager: Local, State and Federal Policy, Navistar, Inc.

TABLE OF SAFETY AND HEALTH CODES

  • Lee Biedrycki de Powhatan, President and CEO, BeneFinder
  • Robert C. Smith of Leesburg, professional engineer

PUBLIC SECURITY AND HOMELAND SECURITY

JUVENILE JUSTICE COUNCIL

  • David Mic of Chesapeake, Attorney, Attorney General’s Office

CRIMINAL JUSTICE SERVICES COMMISSION

  • D. Bradley Marshall of Manassas, Shareholder/Lawyer, Vanderpool, Frostick & Nishanian, PC

# # #

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Washtenaw County Health Department urges lead testing for certain populations https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/washtenaw-county-health-department-urges-lead-testing-for-certain-populations/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 10:16:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/washtenaw-county-health-department-urges-lead-testing-for-certain-populations/ A reminder comes from the Washtenaw County Health Department about the importance of lead testing for children under six and pregnant women who live in certain types of housing. The Washtenaw County Health Department says the people most likely to suffer from lead poisoning are children under the age of six who live in homes […]]]>

A reminder comes from the Washtenaw County Health Department about the importance of lead testing for children under six and pregnant women who live in certain types of housing.

The Washtenaw County Health Department says the people most likely to suffer from lead poisoning are children under the age of six who live in homes built before 1978, when lead-based paint was common.

Pregnant women in these homes are also at risk.

Jane Nickert, director of nursing at the health department, explains that lead ingestion typically occurs when a child touches lead paint dust or lead-filled floors and then puts their hand in their mouth. Unfortunately, she said there are really no signs at the time of the poisoning. Symptoms appear years later.

“I wish he had come with big red bumps, but he doesn’t. So a child who is poisoned at two years old can see in kindergarten or first grade that he is having difficulty ‘learning.”

The Washtenaw County Health Department offers free lead testing for children up to age six with Medicaid or who are uninsured.

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Contact UEMOA news at 734.487.3363 or email us at studio@wemu.org

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Weekly health service, community COVID-19 vaccination clinics until December 30 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/weekly-health-service-community-covid-19-vaccination-clinics-until-december-30/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 09:07:43 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/weekly-health-service-community-covid-19-vaccination-clinics-until-december-30/ (© M.Rode-Foto – stock.adobe.com) The Blue Ridge Health District is ending weekly Department of Health and Community COVID-19 immunization clinics on December 30. Beginning in January, BRHD will only offer Moderna-branded COVID-19 vaccines during regular Health Department immunization clinics, which vary by Health Department. BRHD will no longer host MOBI on the mall in the […]]]>
(© M.Rode-Foto – stock.adobe.com)

The Blue Ridge Health District is ending weekly Department of Health and Community COVID-19 immunization clinics on December 30.

Beginning in January, BRHD will only offer Moderna-branded COVID-19 vaccines during regular Health Department immunization clinics, which vary by Health Department.

BRHD will no longer host MOBI on the mall in the new year.

“We are grateful for the wonderful staff who have dedicated countless hours to community immunization clinics over the past two years,” read a BRHD newsletter emailed today.

As of this week, the majority of Virginia counties see low levels of COVID-19 transmission.

Community members can call their local health department to find out when the general vaccination clinics will take place.

BRHD reminds the community that there are other options for getting the COVID-19 vaccine in the area, including primary care providers, pediatricians, local pharmacies, and grocery stores.

BRHD also said vaccines may no longer be free in 2023 due to changes in federal funding. If they are not free, they will probably be charged by insurance, although the exact cost is not yet known.

“We encourage everyone who is eligible to get a COVID-19 shot or booster before the winter break. BRHD is hosting a number of community vaccination clinics in November and December,” the newsletter read.

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Hamilton County Health Department provides Halloween safety tips https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/hamilton-county-health-department-provides-halloween-safety-tips/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:36:09 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/hamilton-county-health-department-provides-halloween-safety-tips/ CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WDEF) – Halloween night means kids have time to pull out tricks or treats.But being outside in the dark comes with safety concerns. The Hamilton County Health Department wants you to consider some of the dangers present on Halloween night. Holly Clark, a traffic safety educator from Hamilton County, said the dangers included: […]]]>

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WDEF) – Halloween night means kids have time to pull out tricks or treats.But being outside in the dark comes with safety concerns.

The Hamilton County Health Department wants you to consider some of the dangers present on Halloween night. Holly Clark, a traffic safety educator from Hamilton County, said the dangers included: “There is an increase in foot traffic. The kids are excited and can move around unpredictably, and the drivers are always home from work, as it’s a Monday this year.

With these thoughts in mind, now is the time to make sure your family is ready to celebrate safely. Clark suggests that “you need to talk to your kids about safety rules and safe pedestrian behaviors, like looking before crossing the road. Make sure costumes are reflective, fit well, and use makeup instead of masks, as masks can fall over their eyes and obscure their vision of their children. Children also have a light source with them, such as a flashlight, glow stick, reflective tape, stickers. Clark also mentions that this also applies to parents who dress up.

There are additional tips if you live in an area that is not well lit. Clark further suggests that “definitely go in a group, definitely use flashlights, glow sticks, and make sure it’s a well-known neighborhood that you know where you’re going, and don’t go into the house.” from someone you don’t know. ‘t know.”

Safety rules extend to those handing out candy. “A well-lit porch is always a welcome sign,” Clark said. “No decorations obscure the walkway. No open flames for children to touch.

The Department of Health suggests that cheaters or caterers complete their candy collection missions by 9:30 p.m. As always, have fun and be safe on Halloween night!

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Local health department now offers Pfizer bivalent COVID-19 boosters for children ages 5-11 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/local-health-department-now-offers-pfizer-bivalent-covid-19-boosters-for-children-ages-5-11/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 02:33:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/local-health-department-now-offers-pfizer-bivalent-covid-19-boosters-for-children-ages-5-11/ Columbia/Boone County Public Health and Social Services began giving Pfizer bivalent COVID-19 boosters to children ages 5 to 11 on Saturday. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated their vaccine recommendations to include this age group last week. This happened after the FDA cleared the Pfizer bivalent booster for children ages 5 to 11 and […]]]>

Columbia/Boone County Public Health and Social Services began giving Pfizer bivalent COVID-19 boosters to children ages 5 to 11 on Saturday.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated their vaccine recommendations to include this age group last week. This happened after the FDA cleared the Pfizer bivalent booster for children ages 5 to 11 and the Moderna booster for children and teens ages 6 to 17.

Trina Teacutter, nursing supervisor for the health department, said the bivalent booster should be given to children who received their primary COVID-19 vaccines or previous booster shots at least two months ago.

The bivalent booster protects people against the original strain of COVID-19 and the now-dominant omicron variant of the disease.

“It’s not just about protecting your child, it’s about protecting your child’s teacher or, you know, the grandparents who are going to come and visit you on the holidays.”

Trina tea cup

“It’s not just about protecting your child, it’s about protecting your child’s teacher or, you know, the grandparents who are going to come and visit you on the holidays,” Teacutter said. “Children may not fare badly when they catch the disease, but they can transmit very well.”

She said vaccines will be available for children ages 5 and up at all upcoming vaccination events. She added that flu shots and COVID-19 boosters can be given at the same visit.

“We expect the flu season to be quite significant this year,” Teacutter said. “COVID is similar. We think we’re going to see an increase, again, because people are less likely to mask up now. We are more likely to come together.

Teacutter said the Department of Health will have more bivalent booster clinics in the coming weeks, and another comfort clinic for children will be held in November.

You can check available appointments at https://www.como.gov/covidvaccine/.

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New York Department of Health reports 2 deaths from monkeypox, changes name of virus to ‘MVP’ – NBC New York https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-york-department-of-health-reports-2-deaths-from-monkeypox-changes-name-of-virus-to-mvp-nbc-new-york/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 19:45:26 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/new-york-department-of-health-reports-2-deaths-from-monkeypox-changes-name-of-virus-to-mvp-nbc-new-york/ New York City health officials announced two monkey pox-related deaths Friday, the first deaths related to the virus in the five boroughs, although few details on the individuals were immediately available. According to the CDC, the United States has reported four monkeypox-related deaths since the start of the 2022 outbreak, although the latest data update […]]]>

New York City health officials announced two monkey pox-related deaths Friday, the first deaths related to the virus in the five boroughs, although few details on the individuals were immediately available.

According to the CDC, the United States has reported four monkeypox-related deaths since the start of the 2022 outbreak, although the latest data update was on Thursday. The first death was reported in California in September.

New York City officials did not immediately release demographic or other information about the two deceased residents, including whether they had any underlying conditions, but instead offered their condolences in a brief statement.

“We are deeply saddened by the two reported deaths and our hearts go out to the loved ones and community of these individuals. Every effort will be made to prevent further suffering from this virus through continued community engagement, sharing information and vaccination,” said the statement read.

As of October 17, the city had recorded at least 3,695 known cases of the virus. Since peaking in late July, the outbreak of cases in New York City has declined significantly, reaching single-digit daily numbers earlier this month.

To date, more than 143,000 first and second doses of monkeypox vaccine have been administered.

New Yorkers who have received their first doses are strongly advised to receive their second doses 28 days after the first. Walk-in appointments are available.

To find a vaccination point near you, go to https://vaccinefinder.nyc.gov/.

Additionally, the city announced that it would refer to monkeypox as MPV since “the old name is an inaccurate and stigmatizing label for a virus that primarily affects a community that has already suffered from a long history of fanaticism.”

For more information, Click here.

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