Health Department – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 14:29:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Health Department – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 January 15 update from the Department of Health on COVID-19 cases https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/january-15-update-from-the-department-of-health-on-covid-19-cases/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 14:29:25 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/january-15-update-from-the-department-of-health-on-covid-19-cases/ The Tompkins County Health Department says there are now 15,222 total positive cases in Tompkins County, 247 more than Friday, with a total of 1,747,111 tests performed. They also say 14,035 patients are listed as released from isolation after testing positive, 336 new recoveries, leaving 1,137 active cases. The Department of Health is also now […]]]>

The Tompkins County Health Department says there are now 15,222 total positive cases in Tompkins County, 247 more than Friday, with a total of 1,747,111 tests performed. They also say 14,035 patients are listed as released from isolation after testing positive, 336 new recoveries, leaving 1,137 active cases.

The Department of Health is also now reporting positive self-test results that have been submitted through its online portal. They say there are 25 new positive self-test results today for a total of 1,131 submitted.

Related: TCHD: If you test positive on a home test

“This unprecedented increase in cases will force us all to do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19,” Tompkins County Public Health Director Frank Kruppa said Sunday. “These cases are the result of regular daily activity, and while we want things to return to normal, we need to do what we know works to stop the spread. Please wear a mask, avoid gatherings with other people, and get vaccinated and boosted as soon as you can.

Related: Moderna Booster Clinic at Ithaca Mall Vaccination Site This Weekend, Says TCHD

The Department of Health says recent cases show significant community spread – more than 50% of cases are unable to trace where they may have been infected. There is significant spread in households among families and at gatherings, and at large gatherings and parties where precautions are not followed. “A majority of these new cases concern students in higher education,” they add.

Related: New NYS testing site opening this week at Watkins Glen

As of 7:30 a.m. Saturday, the Department of Health said 1,809 tests had been carried out since the last update. The Tompkins County Health Department releases NYS vaccine tracking information showing that 82,249 Tompkins County residents received a first dose and 75,355 completed the vaccination (which may be one or two doses, depending on the vaccine).

Related: High transmission rate for Tompkins, says Department of Health

The Department of Health says 16 people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19, one less than in Friday’s update. Following a data change last winter, “TCHD only reports hospitalized active cases,” rather than including recovered COVID patients who remain hospitalized for other reasons.

Related: Booster doses available for ages 18 and older, says Department of Health

Samantha Hillson of the Health Department tells us that ‘released from isolation’ means the patient has been released after the ‘mandatory ten-day period’, but can be longer if people are still showing symptoms or other complications. Patients are not necessarily negative, as “people can be positive for up to 90 days.”

There have been 50 recorded COVID-19 deaths among Tompkins County residents, including the death of an area resident reported Friday morning. (Two deaths recorded in Tompkins County last spring were among nonresidents, and the Department of Health provides separate statistics.)

Tompkins County Public Health Director Frank Kruppa said, “Of the recent increase in hospitalizations, a large majority have been in unvaccinated people. Of the few vaccinated people who have been hospitalized, the trend is that they were admitted for a non-COVID issue and tested positive upon admission.

Related: As Cases Rise and Hospitals Fill, New York State’s Mask Mandate Begins Monday

On January 14, Cornell University reported 86 new positive cases for January 13, 124 student cases this week, with a positivity rate of 5.38%. Cornell only updates its dashboard on weekdays, and their update schedule does not allow for direct comparison with county statistics.

As of January 13, Ithaca College has reported 1 active student case, with 338 recovered cases, 14 active employee cases, and 81 recovered employee cases.

“All positive cases are unique individuals,” says the Ministry of Health. Some of the negative test results are from people who need to be tested multiple times, and so this tally is likely to reflect the same person multiple times in many cases.

The health department says its statistics include tests that Cornell University began performing last summer on July 16. Cornell launched its own COVID-19 data dashboard last summer on August 25.

Related: New Cornell COVID-19 Dashboard Shows Test Results and Alert Level

The Department of Health says the public must prevent the spread of COVID-19 not only to protect themselves, but also for other members of our community who are most likely to get seriously ill – the elderly, the immunocompromised and people with underlying chronic conditions. health conditions. Everyone can take these steps to stop the spread of COVID-19 and “flatten the curve” in our community.

Frank Kruppa of TCHD says, “There is a very high vaccination rate in our community, especially with the successes that have been reported by our local colleges. In addition to arrival and surveillance testing, many of our new cases result from sustained close contact with a positive person, i.e. more than 10 minutes within six feet of a case. positive. These close contacts occur more frequently during large indoor gatherings that mix different groups of people.

“Tompkins County is now in the ‘high’ transmission rate as defined by the CDC,” the Department of Health says. “A high transmission rate occurs when there are more than 100 positive cases per 100,000 population over a seven-day period. The advisory for county residents to wear a mask indoors while around other people continues to be in place.

For more, follow 14850.com on Facebook, instagram, and Twitter or subscribe to 14850 Magazine Daily Bulletin.

Related: Coverage of coronavirus in 14850 today

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How long are you contagious with an Omicron COVID infection? Here’s what the health experts are saying – NBC Chicago https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/how-long-are-you-contagious-with-an-omicron-covid-infection-heres-what-the-health-experts-are-saying-nbc-chicago/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:57:37 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/how-long-are-you-contagious-with-an-omicron-covid-infection-heres-what-the-health-experts-are-saying-nbc-chicago/ As more children remain in classrooms in Chicago and omicron cases continue to flood the city, people are wondering how long they will be contagious after contracting COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines last month, shifting the timing of isolation and quarantine because some experts say the time when people […]]]>

As more children remain in classrooms in Chicago and omicron cases continue to flood the city, people are wondering how long they will be contagious after contracting COVID-19.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines last month, shifting the timing of isolation and quarantine because some experts say the time when people are most contagious is earlier.

“It takes less time from when someone is exposed to COVID to potentially develop an infection. It takes less time to develop symptoms, it takes less time for someone to be contagious and it takes, for many people, less time to recover This is largely due to many more people being vaccinated,” said Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady.

The Illinois Department of Public Health said the CDC’s changes come as “the omicron variant continues to spread in the United States and reflects current science on when and how long a person is most contagious.” “.

So when is a person with COVID most contagious?

Here’s what we know.

When are people with COVID most contagious?

The CDC says its guidelines have been updated to reflect growing evidence that suggests transmission of COVID-19 often occurs one to two days before symptoms appear and for two to three days afterward.

“It has to do with the CDC data that really showed that after seven days there was virtually no risk of transmission at this point,” Arwady said. “And in that five to seven day window, you know, there are some that depend on whether people have been vaccinated, underlying conditions, etc., but the risk goes down a lot and the feeling is that in the general population, combined with masking, etc. the risk is really very low.”

For those with no symptoms, CDC guidelines say they are considered contagious at least two days before they test positive.

When is the best time to get tested after exposure?

The CDC says anyone who may have been exposed to someone with COVID should be tested five days after exposure or as soon as symptoms appear.

“If symptoms appear, individuals should immediately self-quarantine until a negative test confirms that the symptoms are not attributable to COVID-19,” the guidelines state.

Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said incubation times could change, but those who test early should continue testing even if they test negative.

“We may be learning that the incubation time could be a bit shorter. So maybe you would test at two days,” Ezike said. “Obviously, if you’re symptomatic, you test straight away. But you know, if you want to test at two days, but that negative test… the two days shouldn’t make you think, ‘Oh well, I’m clear,’ you know?You might want to test again and of course symptoms that you can’t ignore – scratchy throat, headaches, all kinds of symptoms – anything new can be a symptom of this new disease.

How soon can symptoms appear?

According to previous CDC guidelines, symptoms of COVID can appear anywhere from two to 14 days after a person has been exposed to the virus.

Anyone with symptoms should get tested for COVID-19.

How long should you quarantine or self-isolate?

First, those who think they have been in contact with someone who has COVID and is not vaccinated should self-quarantine. Those who test positive, regardless of their vaccination status, must self-isolate, according to the Centers for Control and Prevention of Disasters.

Here is the difference between the two:

Quarantine

Those who have been within six feet of a person with COVID for a cumulative total of at least 15 minutes in a 24-hour period must quarantine for five days if unvaccinated, or if they are more than six months away from their second dose of the vaccine, according to updated CDC guidelines released Monday.

Once this period is over, they must participate in strict mask use for another five days.

Previously, the CDC said people who weren’t fully vaccinated and who came into close contact with an infected person should stay home for at least 10 days.

Before Monday, fully vaccinated people — who the CDC defined as having two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine — could be exempt from quarantine.

Those who are both fully vaccinated and boosted do not need to quarantine if in close contact with someone with COVID, but should wear a mask for at least 10 days after exposure. The same goes for those who are fully vaccinated and not yet eligible for their booster.

Local health authorities can also make the final decision on how long a quarantine will last, however, and testing can play a part.

The Illinois Department of Health has said it will adopt the CDC’s revised guidance on isolation and quarantine for COVID.

In Chicago, those who travel to or from certain parts of the country and are not vaccinated must quarantine upon arrival in the city, but how long they must do so depends on whether or not they get tested. screening for COVID.

The city has not yet said whether the new CDC guidelines will change its guidance on travel advice.

Since Tuesday, the city recommendations for travelers recommends those traveling from designated advisory states to:

  • Get tested with a virus test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days.
  • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
    • If you test positive, isolate yourself to protect others from infection.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.

Isolation

COVID-positive people should stay home for five days, the CDC said Monday, changing the guidelines from the previously recommended 10 days.

At the end of the period, if you have no symptoms, you can resume your normal activities but you must wear a mask everywhere – even at home around others – for at least five more days.

If you still have symptoms after being isolated for five days, stay home until you feel better, then start your five days of mask-wearing at any time.

So how do you calculate your isolation period?

According to the CDC, “Day 0 is your first day of symptoms.” This means that day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms started.

For those who test positive for COVID but have no symptoms, day 0 is the day of the positive test. Those who develop symptoms after testing positive, however, must start their calculations again, with day 0 then becoming the first day of symptoms.

When should you call a doctor?

The CDC urges those who have or may have COVID-19 to watch for emergency warning signs and seek immediate medical attention if they experience symptoms, including:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Pale, gray, or blue skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone

“This list does not contain all possible symptoms,” the CDC says. “Please call your doctor for any other symptoms that are serious or cause you concern.”

You can also let the operator know that you think you or someone you are caring for has COVID.

What if you get a positive result using a home test?

Those who test positive using a home test are urged to follow the latest CDC guidelines and report results to their healthcare provider, who is responsible for reporting test results to the Department of Health. state health.

According to the Chicago Area Health Department, people should assume test results are accurate and should self-isolate from others to reduce the risk of spreading the virus.

“If you test positive for COVID-19, you should self-isolate,” Arwady said. “There’s no need to repeat a positive test at home in a medical setting. We don’t want people going to the emergency room just to get tested. Treat a positive as a positive, stay home and self-isolate. you for five days.”

When can you be with other people after having COVID?

If you had symptoms, the CDC says you can be with others after you isolate for five days and stop showing symptoms. However, you should continue to wear masks for five days after symptoms end to minimize risk to others.

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Utah says COVID treatment scoring review has nothing to do with Tucker Carlson https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/utah-says-covid-treatment-scoring-review-has-nothing-to-do-with-tucker-carlson/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:30:02 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/utah-says-covid-treatment-scoring-review-has-nothing-to-do-with-tucker-carlson/ Utah’s risk factors for determining who is eligible for limited monoclonal antibody treatments for COVID-19 are being reassessed, the state’s health department said on Tuesday, a day after the host of Fox News, Tucker Carlson, slammed Utah and other states for giving more weight to non-whites. “No one automatically qualifies for treatment based on their […]]]>

Utah’s risk factors for determining who is eligible for limited monoclonal antibody treatments for COVID-19 are being reassessed, the state’s health department said on Tuesday, a day after the host of Fox News, Tucker Carlson, slammed Utah and other states for giving more weight to non-whites.

“No one automatically qualifies for treatment based on their race / ethnicity,” Utah Department of Health spokesperson Tom Hudachko said in a statement on the “Risk Score Calculator. The state’s COVID-19 treatment, ”created in 2020 to help determine who is most at risk for serious illness, hospitalization, and death from the virus.

But Hudachko told Deseret News he had “no idea what Tucker Carlson said” about Utah, so the decision to review the risk factors is “unrelated to what he said”.

The calculator assigns points to various factors, including 0.05 for each decade of age; one for each man and / or having various specific comorbidities including hypertension, congestive heart failure and chronic liver or kidney disease.

The highest number of points awarded, two each, are awarded for obesity, diabetes or severe immune deficiency; or to be “non-white or Hispanic / Latinx”. Unvaccinated Utahns now need at least 7.5 points to qualify for treatment, or at least 10 if fully vaccinated, according to the document.

The necessary scores were increased last week as omicron limited the availability of intravenous therapy, as two of the three available types were not effective against the extremely fast-spreading COVID-19 variant which has spiked the number of cases in the country. Utah more than double. record levels.

The Utahns were warned by healthcare providers on Thursday that there was only enough treatment for 1 in 100 people who would qualify due to the state’s “truly dire stance on COVID- 19 ”. On Tuesday, the state’s health department reported 9,813 new cases and 15 more deaths from the virus, including three that occurred before December 11.

Hudachko said the scarcity was the reason the factors were reassessed last week and are being reviewed again.

“The use of the COVID-19 Treatment Risk Score Calculator has evolved throughout the pandemic, but has always relied on current clinical data from COVID-19 patients. Given the extreme scarcity of COVID-19 treatments due to the prevalence of the Omicron variant, we are re-evaluating the calculator and comparing it to current data, ”he said.

Gov. Spencer Cox’s office said it had received around 50 calls regarding Carlson’s claims on Fox News that COVID-19 vaccines and treatments were being refused due to race, pointing to Utah, New York, Minnesota and other states. The Fox News host cited the Utah Rating System.

Utah has “sorted” COVID-19 patients using a scoring system that Carlson said “gives anyone two points just for not being white.” You win if you are not white. If you have congestive heart failure at the same time, you get a point. So if you are a white patient with congestive heart failure, this is not enough for you. “

Carlson went on to say that what Utah and other states are doing “it’s not health care, it’s punishment, it’s punishment imposed on the basis of skin color.” , which he says is justified because “the United States has abused racial minorities in centuries past,” they say. Therefore, whites must suffer now.

The risk factors, Hudashko said, came from a subcommittee of the Utah Crisis Care Standards Workgroup and are based on data and research provided by Intermountain Healthcare. The standards put in place by the working group aim to define how health care should be rationed, as demand exceeds what is available.

Health system research has evaluated more than 100,000 Utahns who have tested positive for COVID-19, taking into account variables such as age, gender, symptoms, chronic disease and geography, and found that non-whites or Hispanics / Latinxes are 35 to 50% more likely to be hospitalized, Hudachko said.

Although race does not automatically qualify someone to receive monoclonal antibody treatment, other factors do, such as living in a long-term care facility, being unvaccinated and pregnant, or having severe immunocompromised disease, did he declare.

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San Francisco Health Department to Cut COVID Test Site Hours of Operation Due to Staff Shortage https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/san-francisco-health-department-to-cut-covid-test-site-hours-of-operation-due-to-staff-shortage/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 03:09:36 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/san-francisco-health-department-to-cut-covid-test-site-hours-of-operation-due-to-staff-shortage/ SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) – With the omicron variant soaring, experts say demand for COVID testing has never been greater. But a Bay Area city said it was forced to cut testing appointments during this critical time. The lines for COVID testing are long no matter where you are in the Santa Rosa Bay area in […]]]>
SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) – With the omicron variant soaring, experts say demand for COVID testing has never been greater. But a Bay Area city said it was forced to cut testing appointments during this critical time.

The lines for COVID testing are long no matter where you are in the Santa Rosa Bay area in Antioch, where California National Guard troops are now assisting at this testing site.

We are here to support whatever they need, which is a good thing, ”said Sgt. Victor Del Real of the California National Guard.

In San Francisco, there was a long line Sunday for testing at school district headquarters, stretching around the block. Some parents waited two hours.

RELATED: Some Bay Area Families Wait Over 7 Hours for COVID PCR Tests

“With omicron on the rise, it’s important to get tested,” said Stefanie Garcia, senior at Lowell High School.

SFUSD says it performed 11,000 rapid tests in the past week and distributed 57,000 home test kits.

It’s great that they do these testing sites, the lines are long but people are diligently getting tested, ”said parent Liz Maino.

Even a member of ABC7 News’ vaccination team, Dr Alok Patel was recently challenged to find a test after he had possible exposure to COVID.

RELATED: Exposed To COVID At A Holiday Gathering? What you need to know about quarantine, testing

“I tested negative for several days on a rapid antigen but wanted to confirm with a PCR test and had to go through my doctor and wait more than an hour in line, it is not a luxury that everyone a, “Patel said.

The San Francisco Department of Public Health is now warning of test site slowdowns next week. He tweeted:

“On Monday, some SFDPH affiliate sites will temporarily reduce testing hours due to issues beyond our control. Please check your health care system first for testing, do not go to the emergency room for testing.”

San Francisco supervisor Matt Haney calls this unacceptable.

“This is something we need to prepare for, we should have back-up plans,” Haney said.

RELATED: SFFD Urges Public To Avoid Calling 911 For Non-Emergencies When There Is A Staff Shortage

Haney says the public health department told him that some COVID testing sites were experiencing staff shortages at a time when COVID was on the rise.

“Day to day testing capacity is reduced in the biggest increase on record in the pandemic, so we need more responses, more oversight and accountability,” he said.

Haney says he will convene a hearing next week to discuss solutions to keep test sites open, or even increase capacity.

VACCINE TRACKER: How’s California, When You Can Get Your Coronavirus Vaccine

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La Crosse County Health Department Hosts Collaborative Appeal Regarding Recent COVID Outbreak in Coulee Area | Coronavirus https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/la-crosse-county-health-department-hosts-collaborative-appeal-regarding-recent-covid-outbreak-in-coulee-area-coronavirus/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:02:17 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/la-crosse-county-health-department-hosts-collaborative-appeal-regarding-recent-covid-outbreak-in-coulee-area-coronavirus/ As the Coulee region begins 2022, COVID-19 cases are on the rise. LA CROSSE, Wisconsin (WXOW) – As the Coulee area begins in 2022, COVID-19 cases are on the rise. The recent spike has further weighed down schools, businesses and healthcare facilities that are already staffed with limited staff. To address the growing problem, the […]]]>

As the Coulee region begins 2022, COVID-19 cases are on the rise.



LA CROSSE, Wisconsin (WXOW) – As the Coulee area begins in 2022, COVID-19 cases are on the rise. The recent spike has further weighed down schools, businesses and healthcare facilities that are already staffed with limited staff.

To address the growing problem, the La Crosse County Health Department held a collaborative appeal with representatives from the Gundersen and Mayo Clinic health systems.

Audra Martine, director of the health department, said it was important for the community to realize how quickly the spike in COVID cases is affecting the region.






“We are currently seeing an impact of the Omicron variant in our community on individuals not only for their personal health, but also for its impact on many areas of our community and our ability to function as a community,” said Martine.

Gundersen Health System CEO Dr Scott Rathgaber wants to forestall the spread of the virus before it affects already overcrowded hospitals.






Dr Scott Rathgaber - CEO - Gundersen Health System.jpg

“We are worried if we don’t respond that we will have a diminishing ability to care for everyone if we continue on the path we are on,” said Dr Rathgaber. “This is why we are asking for help from the community to help us maintain care not only for those infected with COVID who need to be hospitalized, but for all the other illnesses we are caring for in the community. community.”

The number of daily cases continues to increase



Health officials said the sense of urgency was justified with more than a thousand new cases last week.

“Before winter, it was common for us to see a daily case rate with an average number typically less than a hundred,” Martine said. “We are now seeing that these counts are going very quickly in the last few days with 2, 3 or maybe even 4 times the daily count that we had seen before.”

At these rates of spread, doctors suggest people take extra care in public.

“Suppose people who feel good go for a walk,” Dr. Rathgaber said. “At least 10% or more of them are infected.”

Escalation Rate Case in Coulee Region



Dr Paul Mueller, regional vice president of the health system at the Mayo Clinic, said the community must take control and use the tools to limit the spread already available to them.






Dr Paul Mueller - Regional Vice President - Mayo Clinic Health system.jpg

“We are here today to ask you to do the following evidence-based things and these are approved by the Centers for Disease Control,” Dr. Mueller said before listing the preventative measures. “Mask yourself when you are in public and mask yourself when you are around other people and use effective masks. Social distancing, think critically before attending meetings. Stay home when you are sick , but if you have symptoms, get tested. Please get vaccinated. The mainly patients we have in the hospital with COVID have not been vaccinated. “

The health ministry is also calling on the public to work together to combat the spread of the virus.

“Right now is a good time to think about the things we do that are risky and how we protect each other from what we are involved in and with whom,” Martine said. “We are not asking for a legal mandate of any kind, but asking the community to come together to help us get through this.”

For current COVID-19 data in La Crosse County, see the Department of Health’s information page here: COVID-19[female[feminine


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Health Ministry mourns loss of longtime advocate | Local news https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/health-ministry-mourns-loss-of-longtime-advocate-local-news/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/health-ministry-mourns-loss-of-longtime-advocate-local-news/ A voice that was well known for health care in Hardin County is silent. Terrie Burgan, 57, of the Lincoln Trail District Health Department died Saturday after a battle with peripheral T cell lymphoma. With the pandemic and numerous health issues in the region, Burgan has helped communicate concerns, needs and precautions in the region. […]]]>

A voice that was well known for health care in Hardin County is silent.

Terrie Burgan, 57, of the Lincoln Trail District Health Department died Saturday after a battle with peripheral T cell lymphoma.

With the pandemic and numerous health issues in the region, Burgan has helped communicate concerns, needs and precautions in the region.

“Her presence, her kindness, her dedication and her defense of the interests of those most in need will be missed,” said Director of Public Health Sara Jo Best. “We will aspire to live by the great example Terrie has set for us.”

She worked for the health district for 11 years as Maternal and Child Health Coordinator, Clinic Director, Health Promotion Officer and Public Information Officer.

A press release from LTDHD stated that his passions are health equity and social justice.

She was instrumental in the Ride to Work program to help people experiencing homelessness have round-trip transportation to and from work.

As a member of the Warm Blessings Board of Directors, she was President when Warm Blessings General Manager Dawn Cash was hired.

Cash said Burgan was the first person she met from Warm Blessings.

“Under Terrie’s leadership, our organization stabilized during my transition and actually grew, even during the pandemic,” Cash said. “What was remarkable to me was the way she was able to juggle her role within the health department, leading the board and life in general. “

Cash said she will miss the discussions and problem-solving sessions with Burgan.

“Terrie has always been so calm, rational and always had such thoughtful ideas,” Cash said. “She was a quiet but powerful force in our community and a great support for me in my new role as Executive Director.”

Burgan received the 2020 Paul Mason Award from the Kentucky Public Health Association and in 2021 she received the Beacon of Light Award from Elizabethtown Community and Technical College.

She also served for 20 years in the United States Army, retiring as a Major.

Visitations begin at 12:30 p.m. Friday at the Chism Family Funeral Home in Vine Grove. The funeral is at 1:30 p.m.

A funeral service with military honors will be held at 2:30 p.m. on January 20 at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery Central in Radcliff.

Expressions of condolence can be sent to the Lymphoma Research Foundation.

You can reach Becca Owsley at 270-505-1416 bowsley@thenewsenterprise.com.


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Dr. Paulette Gray Riveria Joins Louisiana Department of Health as Capital Region Medical Director / Administrator https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dr-paulette-gray-riveria-joins-louisiana-department-of-health-as-capital-region-medical-director-administrator/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:56:58 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dr-paulette-gray-riveria-joins-louisiana-department-of-health-as-capital-region-medical-director-administrator/ Dr. Paulette L. Gray Riveria has joined the Louisiana Department of Health as Regional Medical Director / Administrator for Region 2. Dr. Gray Riveria is a licensed family physician with clinical and public health work. was framed by a passion for elucidating and dismantling the foundations of inequalities in healthcare, actively advocating for social justice […]]]>

Dr. Paulette L. Gray Riveria has joined the Louisiana Department of Health as Regional Medical Director / Administrator for Region 2. Dr. Gray Riveria is a licensed family physician with clinical and public health work. was framed by a passion for elucidating and dismantling the foundations of inequalities in healthcare, actively advocating for social justice within healthcare systems, and promoting medical professionalism.

Dr Gray Riveria was recently a consultant to the Bureau of Public Health, conducting a new statewide assessment of the attitudes and experiences of healthcare workers related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prior to her research at the Ministry, Dr. Gray Riveria worked primarily as a primary care provider within the federally licensed health center system. She also has diverse work experience that includes usage management and entrepreneurship, as well as global health experience in Ghana, India and Senegal. Dr. Gray Riveria is in a part-time clinical practice.

Dr. Gray Riveria grew up primarily in the communities of Mississippi, St. Tammy Parish, and East Baton Rouge Parish, and graduated from McKinley High School in Baton Rouge. She received her BA from Louisiana Tech University, an MD from Johns Hopkins, a Masters of Public Health from Harvard, and a Masters of Commerce from the University of Illinois at Chicago.


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LHSAA rejects Department of Health recommendation to suspend events | Pelican Post https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/lhsaa-rejects-department-of-health-recommendation-to-suspend-events-pelican-post/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:14:41 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/lhsaa-rejects-department-of-health-recommendation-to-suspend-events-pelican-post/ The Louisiana High School Athletic Association, by memorandum dated December 30, 2021, refused to adopt a sports events suspension recommendation issued by the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH). The memorandum from LHSAA Executive Director Eddie Bonine is reprinted below. Subject: LDH K-12 Recommendations / Updated Isolation / Quarantine Please find attached the most recent communication […]]]>

The Louisiana High School Athletic Association, by memorandum dated December 30, 2021, refused to adopt a sports events suspension recommendation issued by the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH). The memorandum from LHSAA Executive Director Eddie Bonine is reprinted below.


Subject: LDH K-12 Recommendations / Updated Isolation / Quarantine

Please find attached the most recent communication this office received from the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH). In the communication, the state epidemiologist and director of the infectious disease epidemiology program recommended a suspension of extracurricular activities due to the increase in the COVID-19 variant Omicron. At this time, the LHSAA will not be issuing a concurrent recommendation for the suspension of the inter-school extracurricular competition. The LHSAA will respectfully cede to the Local Education Agency (LEA) and / or the education system to decide whether a termination of the inter-school extracurricular competition should / or should not occur.

If the LEA / School System in which you reside chooses to follow LDH’s recommendations and suspend participation, please be aware that all games, contests or matches will be recorded as canceled, if applicable, no power points awarded, and reprogramming or addition no later than January 29, 2022 permissive, will not be allowed. If the LEA / education system in which you reside chooses to suspend participation, that suspension will remain in effect until a notice of participation is posted. Please inform this office as soon as possible if you decide to discontinue your participation. If the LEA / education system in which you reside chooses to continue the interschool extracurricular participation during this same period, this play, match or contest program will be recognized and any accepted practices in place for the games being canceled due to of a school and / or the inability of the school to complete the match, contest or scheduled match due to issues related to COVID-19, will always be considered a forfeit and, where applicable, points of power will be allocated accordingly.

In conclusion, I have the greatest confidence that all the members of our association are doing what is acceptable and fair for their respective communities. I know this because you have all proven it throughout this disruption and ongoing challenges of COVID-19.

Respectfully,

Eddie Bonine

Executive Director

LHSAA

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Health Ministry reports 452 new cases – an all-time high for 2021 | Covid19 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/health-ministry-reports-452-new-cases-an-all-time-high-for-2021-covid19/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:45:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/health-ministry-reports-452-new-cases-an-all-time-high-for-2021-covid19/ Franklin County finished 2021 with its highest average daily workload of the year. From December 25 to 31, there were 452 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county, according to a weekly update from the Franklin County Department of Health. That’s an average of 64.57 cases per day, which is the highest average reported by […]]]>

Franklin County finished 2021 with its highest average daily workload of the year. From December 25 to 31, there were 452 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county, according to a weekly update from the Franklin County Department of Health.

That’s an average of 64.57 cases per day, which is the highest average reported by the Department of Health since December 22, 2020, when it reported there was an average of 64.90 confirmed cases per day during the previous 10 days.

The 452 cases last week represent a jump from last week, Dec. 18-24, when the county reported 371 new cases. That brings the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the county to 15,330 with an additional 3,923 cases classified as probable.

No new deaths were reported in the county this week. The number of confirmed deaths from this virus stands at 232 with 39 additional deaths listed as probable.

The positivity rate – the percentage of COVID-19 tests that come back positive – was 16.2% from December 25 to 31. That’s up from last week, December 18-24, when the positivity rate was 14%.

According to the health department, there are four people hospitalized and in isolation for COVID-19 and two active long-term care cases. However, officials at Mercy Hospital Washington, the largest hospital in Franklin County, told the Missourian that its intensive care units were so full that staff were forced to send patients to hospitals in St. Louis, Columbia. and Springfield because they didn’t have enough beds. Dr Ann-Elizabeth Mohart, chief medical officer at Mercy Hospital Washington, previously said the health department‘s count did not include patients who are no longer contagious with COVID-19, but have not recovered from symptoms post -COVID-19 such as pneumonia and others.

In Franklin County, 50% of residents are fully immunized and 53.8% have received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Seniors Services. Statewide, 53.7% of Missourians are fully immunized and 60.7% have received at least one dose, according to DHSS.

Amid this surge in COVID-19, Missouri Governor Mike Parson has ended the state of emergency he declared at the start of the pandemic.

“Thanks to the vaccine’s effectiveness, widespread efforts to mitigate the virus, and our committed healthcare professionals, the past needs to maintain a state of emergency are no longer present,” Parson said in a press release. announcing the decision. “The state is ready to provide assistance and response, but the state of emergency is no longer necessary.

The expiration means the Missouri National Guard will no longer be activated for COVID-19-related missions and state agencies “will fully resume pre-pandemic operations,” according to the press release. The press release notes that the state will provide flexibility during this transition.

FP COVID Update 010522


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Navy argues Department of Health does not have the power to shut down Red Hill https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/navy-argues-department-of-health-does-not-have-the-power-to-shut-down-red-hill/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 04:54:35 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/navy-argues-department-of-health-does-not-have-the-power-to-shut-down-red-hill/ In response to an order from the Hawaii Department of Health to empty the WWII fuel facility at the center of a water contamination crisis, the U.S. Navy argues that the state does not has no authority to make such a request. The order proposed by the state “operates in a regulatory vacuum, illegally exceeding […]]]>

In response to an order from the Hawaii Department of Health to empty the WWII fuel facility at the center of a water contamination crisis, the U.S. Navy argues that the state does not has no authority to make such a request.

The order proposed by the state “operates in a regulatory vacuum, illegally exceeding the authority of the DOH”, according to more than 40 pages of objections the Navy filed Wednesday evening.

Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro said earlier this month he would interpret a state demand to shut down Red Hill as a “request.” Cory Lum / Civil Beat / 2021

The state’s order came after the Navy’s water supply system, which serves 93,000 people, was contaminated with fuel, with families reporting serious health effects.

A Ministry of Health hearing officer confirmed on Monday that the order was legal and necessary. Hearing Officer David Day called the situation a “humanitarian and environmental catastrophe” that puts the public in imminent danger. The designation gives the state the power to shut down the Red Hill fuel facility until it makes safety improvements, according to Day’s report.

The Navy disagreed. In his case, Navy lawyer Craig Jensen argues that the DOH cannot take action because the community is not in immediate danger.

“Only the discovery of a real imminent danger and actions adapted to the immediate emergency are authorized under the emergency power of the DOH,” the file said.

Protesters demand the closure of Red Hill, which has threatened Oahu’s drinking water for years. Cory Lum / Civil Beat / 2021

Contamination has already taken place, so the state cannot use it to justify shutting down the facility, the Navy argued.

“There is no evidence on the record to show that the operations of the facility present an inherent risk of causing damage, so simply resuming operations would automatically result in a ‘serious risk; peril; danger ‘which is’ likely to occur at any time’ ”, indicates the file.

Jensen also objected to several other parts of the Hearings Officer’s report. He alleges that Day erroneously considered certain information while ignoring other evidence and that he factored inaccurate information into his decision. The Navy also opposes Day’s claim that the facility is “just too old, too poorly designed, too difficult to maintain, too difficult to inspect, in addition to being too large to realistically prevent future releases “.

The Department of Health’s deputy director of health, Marian Tsuji, will review the Navy’s case and render a decision within 30 days, according to the DOH.

David Henkin, an Earthjustice lawyer who represents the Sierra Club of
Hawaii said the Navy had a legal right to file its disagreements with the order proposed by the hearing officer.

“But he also has a moral obligation to recognize the reality that every day he fights this emergency ordinance is another day when O’ahu’s primary source of drinking water remains threatened with catastrophic contamination and irreversible, “he wrote in a statement.


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