health care – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 05:56:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png health care – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 Kilmer and Fitzpatrick introduce legislation to close the digital equity gap and expand access to IT jobs – The Suburban Times https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/kilmer-and-fitzpatrick-introduce-legislation-to-close-the-digital-equity-gap-and-expand-access-to-it-jobs-the-suburban-times/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 22:08:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/kilmer-and-fitzpatrick-introduce-legislation-to-close-the-digital-equity-gap-and-expand-access-to-it-jobs-the-suburban-times/ Announcement from the office of Representative Derek Kilmer. Today, US Representatives Derek Kilmer (WA-06) and Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-01) presented the Computer Service Act, bipartisan legislation to support local digital equity initiatives while ensuring that more people can gain experience to access jobs in the information technology (IT) sector. the Computer Service Act establish IT Service […]]]>

Announcement from the office of Representative Derek Kilmer.

Today, US Representatives Derek Kilmer (WA-06) and Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-01) presented the Computer Service Act, bipartisan legislation to support local digital equity initiatives while ensuring that more people can gain experience to access jobs in the information technology (IT) sector. the Computer Service Act establish IT Service Corps volunteers focused on digital equity projects within existing AmeriCorps volunteer programming opportunities, ensuring that people can have an equitable opportunity to access valuable IT experience, while supporting digital equity and literacy projects that bridge digital divides in underserved communities.

“We need to ensure today’s workers are prepared for the jobs of tomorrow, including IT jobs. At the same time, countless communities in our region still face digital equity challenges. In recent years, we’ve seen students struggle to log into a course. We have seen older people struggling to get online so they can have a telehealth visit,” Rep. Kilmer said. “The Computer Services Act aims to get people online and help them develop digital literacy skills to access online resources and other needs. It will build the capacity of local digital equity initiatives to supporting communities while ensuring volunteers gain valuable experience relevant to the IT industry.This bill is a win for workers, a win for employers, and a win for local communities.

“I am delighted to join Rep. Kilmer at AmeriCorps Week to introduce the IT Service Corps Act. Currently, professionals looking to enter the IT industry often face significant barriers to entry, including the cost of education and digital literacy gaps, as well as the ability to gain hands-on, hands-on experience Our bipartisan legislation will allow AmeriCorps to establish an IT Service Corps volunteer program, which aims to help volunteers to develop professional and technical skills in information technology and promote digital equity and literacy in underserved communities,” Rep. Fitzpatrick said.

Economists point out that the IT industry has opened doors to new career opportunities at a time when the importance of connecting more Americans and expanding digital equity and literacy has become more important than ever. Unfortunately, there can be significant barriers to acquiring professional and relevant IT skills that prevent the participation of displaced workers and people from marginalized and low-income communities. The ability to stay competitive in a new post-pandemic economy will be critical to the resilience of these members of the workforce.

the Computer Service Act aims to help overcome barriers to entry into the IT workforce and help local communities create more job opportunities. Specifically, the bill:

Head over Heals at Lakewood Playhouse


· Establishes a new authorized use of funds for AmeriCorps to establish IT Service Corps volunteers within their existing programs. IT Service Corps volunteers would focus on digital equity and literacy projects for underserved communities. Through this bill, AmeriCorps may also consider individuals whose jobs have been displaced by the COVID-19 pandemic, or who have experienced long-term unemployment as a result of displacement;

  • Supports funding to provide technology equipment to volunteers while they are on the job;
  • Supports funding to engage technology industry professionals as mentors for IT Service Corps volunteers;
  • Supports the ability of IT Service Corps volunteers to receive training or financial support for training toward an industry-recognized IT certification; and
  • Requires AmeriCorps to report to Congress on workforce information related to IT Service Corps volunteers.

the Computer Service Act is supported by the Washington Workforce Board, America’s Service Commissions, Service Year Alliance, the Corps Network and Bitwise Industries.

DuPont Museum

“On behalf of the US Service and Conservation Corps community, I applaud Rep. Kilmer’s introduction of the IT Service Corps Act. said Mary Ellen Sprenkel, president and CEO of The Corps Network, the National Association of Service and Conservation Corps. “Through decades of experience, we know that Corps programs offer a proven and effective model for engaging young adults in service projects that lead to work experience and the development of in-demand skills. Corps provides a strategy for training and empowering the diverse 21st century workforce we need. This legislation will help provide a variety of career paths for AmeriCorps participants.

“National Service has long been a pathway to well-paying careers and is already a proven program model for addressing the digital literacy gaps present in underserved communities,” said Kristen Bennett, Chief Strategy Officer of Service Year Alliance. “From Philadelphia to the Twin Cities, AmeriCorps members have come together to teach students and new Americans the technology skills they need to advance and thrive, while earning industry-recognized credentials. We are grateful for Rep. Kilmer’s leadership on this proposal that would expand opportunities for young Americans, as well as those displaced from the workforce, to serve their communities while gaining real-world experience in the IT industry.

“The digital divide has prevented many communities, especially disadvantaged, diverse and rural areas, from benefiting from the technology-based economy and jobs. When young people don’t see technology at work in their communities, it’s hard for them to envision a future career in technology. The IT Service Corps will create an important on-ramp to careers in IT and will also bring IT support to communities and individuals in need,” said Eleni Papadakis, executive director of the Washington Workforce Education and Training Coordinating Council. “IT Service Corps members will perform IT duties at nonprofit organizations that oversee their hands-on work experience and may directly assist customers of those organizations, such as assisting low-income residents and seniors to connect with health care providers through telehealth. , teach digital literacy skills, and provide entry-level job seekers with the computer training needed to apply for jobs online.

Charles Wright Academy

“As the nation continues to move towards a digital economy, connectivity and access to online knowledge are essential. Bitwise Industries applauds the efforts of Rep. Kilmer and the major cosponsors of this bill for their advocacy of respected and influential national service programs that bring underserved communities online. Addressing the issues that have prevented disadvantaged Americans from taking advantage of the Internet and information technology is critical to improving their social and economic well-being,” said Jake Soberal, co-founder and CEO of Bitwise Industries.

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Apollo Neuro Raises $15M Series A To Elevate First Wearable Wellness Device That Actively Improves Mental Health | Your money https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/apollo-neuro-raises-15m-series-a-to-elevate-first-wearable-wellness-device-that-actively-improves-mental-health-your-money/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 12:02:22 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/apollo-neuro-raises-15m-series-a-to-elevate-first-wearable-wellness-device-that-actively-improves-mental-health-your-money/ PITTSBURGH–(BUSINESS WIRE)–March 17, 2022– Apollo Neuro, maker of the first scientifically validated wearable device that improves the body’s resistance to stress, today announced it has raised $15 million in Series A funding, valued at more than $100 million, to enable people to take control of their mental health and well-being. This press release is multimedia. […]]]>

PITTSBURGH–(BUSINESS WIRE)–March 17, 2022–

Apollo Neuro, maker of the first scientifically validated wearable device that improves the body’s resistance to stress, today announced it has raised $15 million in Series A funding, valued at more than $100 million, to enable people to take control of their mental health and well-being.

This press release is multimedia. View the full press release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220317005356/en/

Apollo is a wearable wellness device that improves your body’s resistance to stress, so you can relax, sleep, focus, recover, and feel better. (Photo: BusinessWire)

Led by Noetic Fund, the funding will help Apollo Neuro reach new global users who want to feel like a healthier, better version of themselves. Distinctly unique compared to other wellness wearables that only track health metrics, Apollo’s patented stress relief technology actively helps the body recover quickly, enabling better sleep, relaxation and better concentration. Currently, the Apollo wearable is available for a one-time purchase ($349) in the US, Canada, Europe, and Australia/New Zealand, and pairs with a mobile app to help you transition throughout throughout the day.

What is the portable Apollo?

Apollo is a wearable wellness device that improves your body’s resistance to stress, so you can relax, sleep, focus, recover, and feel better. Worn on your wrist or ankle, the Apollo device works by interacting with your sense of touch, emitting quiet, soothing vibrations that help you feel safe and in control. Apollo Neuro’s scientifically validated technology trains your nervous system to bounce back from stress faster, shifting from ‘fight or flight’ to ‘rest and digest’.

Preliminary results from an ongoing sleep study (launched in 2021) show how the Apollo wearable improves sleep quality, as well as important cardiovascular metrics, including heart rate variability (HRV), a key metric recovery and the body’s resilience to stress. The real-world study, with over 500 participants, found that Apollo wearers experience, on average:

  • 19% increase in deep sleep
  • 14% increase in REM sleep
  • 5% lower resting heart rate
  • 11% average increase in heart rate variability (HRV)

“We are thrilled to announce the closure of our Series A, which gives us the opportunity to rapidly accelerate advances in consumer health with the Apollo wearable,” said Dr. David Rabin, psychiatrist, neuroscientist and co-founder of ‘Apollo Neuroscience. “Now, two years after our product was brought to market, we find ourselves living at a time when Apollo Neuro’s scientifically proven anti-stress technology is more vital than ever as we strive to find more balance in our daily life.

Improved health, no health tracking

By 2026, the global wearable technology market will exceed $19.12 billion with more than 344.9 million units shipped in 2022 alone. The Apollo wearable stands out in the category by showcasing the ability to improve health, while other wearables simply track health and data.

“Apollo Neuro’s touchscreen technology represents a whole new way of thinking about wearable devices,” said co-founder and CEO Kathryn Fantauzzi. “Rather than following, Apollo Neuro’s gentle vibrations allow us to control how we feel so we can focus, relax, get deep, restorative sleep, or socialize. Now that our A-series is complete, we’re set.” and ready to offer new ways to experience Apollo Neuro.I am excited to show what is possible when you harness the sense of touch to empower all of us to choose how we feel and experience the world around us.

Developed by neuroscientists and doctors, the Apollo Wearable is a safe, non-invasive stress relief tool for adults and children with no side effects. The Apollo device is a mental health care and beneficial tool for anyone looking to integrate active stress relief technology into their daily lives, from moms-to-be and veterans to top athletes and first timers. stakeholders, all of which can benefit from consistent use.

During research, Apollo users (on average) found:

“At Noetic Fund, we invest in innovative therapies that address significant unmet mental health needs,” said Sa’ad Shah, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Noetic Fund. “Apollo Neuro represents truly disruptive and scalable technology that aids in stress management, sleep, and clarity of mind. We are excited about the potential of the Apollo wearable to complement new therapies, like psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and we Couldn’t be prouder to partner with the Apollo Neuro team to showcase accessible technology that is already changing tens of thousands of lives.”

About Apollo Neuro

Apollo Neuroscience is pioneering new ways to improve mental health by addressing the root of stress and anxiety, the nervous system. The Apollo wearable uses touch therapy to strengthen and rebalance the nervous system, actively improving the body’s resistance to stress. Worn on the wrist or ankle, Apollo’s scientifically validated technology sends gentle vibrations to the body that help you feel safe and in control. It is a simple and unobtrusive tool that trains the nervous system to recover more effectively from stress, with no effort on the part of the user. The result? Less stress, more sleep. Less fatigue, more concentration. The Apollo wearable is safe for adults and children with no side effects. Developed by physicians and neuroscientists, Apollo has been tested in multiple studies and clinical trials and proven to improve heart rate variability (HRV), a biometric key to stress resilience. For more information, visit www.apolloneuro.com.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220317005356/en/

CONTACT: Jack Taylor PR

Izzy Evans

e:apolloneuro@jacktaylorpr.com

Phone. : 586.864.0903

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA PENNSYLVANIA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: CONSUMER ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HEALTH GENERAL HEALTH MENTAL HEALTH SOFTWARE INTERNET FITNESS & NUTRITION MOBILE/WIRELESS FINANCE

SOURCE: Apollo Neuro

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

PUBLISHED: 03/17/2022 08:00 / DISK: 03/17/2022 08:02

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Prenatal mindfulness program improves stress response in infants https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/prenatal-mindfulness-program-improves-stress-response-in-infants/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:00:09 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/prenatal-mindfulness-program-improves-stress-response-in-infants/ Infants whose mothers participated in a mindfulness-based program during pregnancy had healthier stress responses at 6 months of age, according to a new study from UC San Francisco. This is the first known study to show that a prenatal social intervention can improve offspring health outcomes, as measured by autonomic nervous system responses, said Amanda […]]]>

Infants whose mothers participated in a mindfulness-based program during pregnancy had healthier stress responses at 6 months of age, according to a new study from UC San Francisco.

This is the first known study to show that a prenatal social intervention can improve offspring health outcomes, as measured by autonomic nervous system responses, said Amanda Noroña-Zhou, PhD, first author of the study in psychosomatic medicine.

“It’s really well established that maternal stress during pregnancy increases the risk of health problems in children,” said Noroña-Zhou, PhD, a clinical psychologist affiliated with UCSF’s Center for Health and Community. “But we haven’t had a good understanding of how this process takes place and the biological mechanisms that underlie it, or whether we can buffer the effects of stress on negative health outcomes.”

The researchers studied 135 mother-child dyads from low-income, racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds who were experiencing high stress in their lives. Infants whose mothers followed an eight-week mindfulness-based program had faster cardiovascular recovery after stressful interactions, as well as more self-soothing behavior, than those who did not.

An ability to “bounce back” from stress is linked to better health outcomes later in life, said Nicki Bush, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences and lead author of the study.

“There’s been so little research on what we can do in the positive pathway; it’s mostly been about showing the negative effects of prenatal stress,” Bush said. “This is the next frontier – interventions for moms that have positive effects on mom and baby.”

Quick recovery after a stressful event

The study follows one from 2019 showing that the same mindfulness intervention reduced stress and depression in mothers, as well as improved their glucose tolerance and physical activity levels.

To elicit the infants’ stress response, mothers were trained in the “still face paradigm”, in which mothers played with their infants for two minutes, then maintained a completely neutral facial expression for two minutes and ignored requests for help. beware of babies. They repeated the play-skip cycle and finished with two minutes of play.

Using electrodes, the researchers collected measurements of the infants’ autonomic nervous system activity — the fight-or-flight and rest and digest responses — during exercise. Trained observers, who were unaware of treatment status, also coded the infants’ behavioral responses.

The fight-or-flight response of babies whose mothers had completed the mindfulness program was more acute when they were ignored by their mothers and also recoiled more quickly after the stressor subsided than babies in the control group. Babies in the treatment group exhibited more self-soothing behavior, such as sucking their thumbs and looking at their hands as well.

“A strong reaction and quick recovery is healthy because we want our bodies to be ready for action when something goes wrong and then easily return to normal,” Bush said. “Babies whose mothers did not receive the intervention had a later response. They did not respond strongly until the threat passed, then they did not calm down easily once the threat past.”

Support for a bigenerational approach

The team intentionally chose mothers for their research who had high levels of stress due to their life situations, including financial difficulties and health problems, to ensure that the intervention worked for those who might benefit the most, Bush said.

“We hope this kind of data can encourage policy makers and advocates to say, hey, this was an inexpensive group intervention that reduced depression and stress for mothers, and may improve long-term well-being. term babies at the same time,” Bush said. .

These “two-generation” programs that cater to both caregivers and children are becoming increasingly popular in California. Last year’s state budget allocated $800 million to create a Medi-Cal dyadic patient care benefit, which will allow caregivers and babies to be treated together for behavioral health. Home visitation programs, in which pregnant women and new mothers receive visits from early childhood professionals who provide parenting guidance, are on the rise for a proposed $50 million increase in the state budget 2022-23.

“Pregnancy is an incredible window of opportunity for mothers and babies,” Bush said. “We could, as a society, save a lot of money while doing the right thing for the next generation.”

Authors: In addition to Drs. Noroña-Zhou and Bush, UCSF co-authors are Michael Coccia, MS, Elissa Epel, PhD, and Nancy E. Adler, of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Karen Jones-Mason, JD, PhD. All are affiliated with the Center for Health and Community and the Weill Institutes for Neurosciences. Abbey Alkon, PhD, UCSF Department of Health Care Nursing, also co-author. Other authors and affiliations can be found in the article.

Funding: This study was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute under award numbers U01 HL097973 and R01 HL116511, Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholars Program, Lisa and John Pritzker Family Fund, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences -National Institutes of Health (UCSF-CTSI UL1 TR000004), the Tauber Family Foundation and the Lisa Stone Pritzker Family Foundation.

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Transition period not ‘the new normal’ with COVID-19 – The Fort Morgan Times https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/transition-period-not-the-new-normal-with-covid-19-the-fort-morgan-times/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 02:46:08 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/transition-period-not-the-new-normal-with-covid-19-the-fort-morgan-times/ This is not the “new normal”. The Northeast Colorado Department of Health released a statement Monday saying that with respect to COVID-19, the recent drop in cases reflects a transition period between the pandemic and the virus becoming endemic. . When this happens, the health department suggests that COVID will be more like the flu […]]]>

This is not the “new normal”.

The Northeast Colorado Department of Health released a statement Monday saying that with respect to COVID-19, the recent drop in cases reflects a transition period between the pandemic and the virus becoming endemic. . When this happens, the health department suggests that COVID will be more like the flu in that it will primarily circulate at certain times of the year and may require annual vaccinations.

“During this intermediate phase, there will likely be periods of progress (as we are currently seeing with lower case rates and fewer hospitalizations) towards reversals where our health care system will again be stressed and the recommendations will change. While many precautionary measures, such as masking, may be relaxed by health officials now, expect that they may be reinstated if increases in COVID-19 cases occur,” the report said. communicated.

The number of new cases in northeast Colorado has dropped since the last peak over the holidays, when the omicron variant was circulating widely. In the NCHD’s six-county district, there have been an average of 3.79 new cases per day over the past 14 days, according to data from the NCHD website. In the past week, two residents have been hospitalized with COVID and one has reported a death from the virus. Logan County has seen nine new cases, and Morgan County only five, in the past seven days.

The NCHD statement comes as people prepare to travel for Spring Break and the upcoming summer season.

“It’s good to keep in mind that travel mandates and quarantines will still be in effect for some states and for some international travel, so be sure to check the requirements before you travel. They can also change quickly, so check them often before you go. Researching guidelines and policies for every place you will visit, even stopover airports, would also be a good plan so that you are not caught off guard,” the department says.

The NCHD also noted that while the risk of catching COVID-19 is currently low, it is not zero. Masking “remains an important tool to reduce the risk of infection”, especially for people at high risk of serious illness.

“While many of us are comfortable not wearing masks anymore, masks are still recommended indoors for people with chronic conditions and in high-risk communities. Therefore, be kind and respectful. We cannot know the situations that people face in their personal lives. It is possible that they are immunocompromised or protective of a loved one,” the statement read. Some businesses, such as hospitals and long-term care facilities, may continue to require masks to protect vulnerable people. The NCHD recommends carrying a mask in your wallet or purse to ensure you have one available if you are asked to wear one.

Certain environments also pose an increased risk of exposure to COVID-19, and the health department has advised weighing your comfort level beforehand by considering where you plan to go and avoiding crowded and/or confined spaces. , and close contact environments where people are conversing.

“Risk continues to increase in places or events where these factors overlap,” the statement noted.

Beyond masking, the NCHD advises continuing to follow basic mitigation practices to prevent the spread of COVID-19:

“First of all, it’s important to stay up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations and get tested if you have symptoms. If you feel sick, stay home, self-isolate, and get treated if necessary, “says the department. “Avoid touching your face. Cover your cough and sneeze with your elbow. Keep your hands clean and wash them often. If possible, keep a distance of at least 6 inches from others and regularly disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

The NCHD notes the progress made over the past two years to treat and prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“Hopefully, future COVID-19 mitigation efforts will be less disruptive as we move towards a ‘new normal’ by combining the proven basics, with new medical developments, such as vaccinations and therapeutic treatments. It is also true that as this virus continues to evolve, public health recommendations will adapt to changing conditions and, as before, the Northeast Colorado Department of Health will continue to share the most relevant to our communities,” he says.

For more information on COVID-19 in Northeast Colorado, visit www.nchd.org.

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Health services are feeling the lasting effects of COVID-related threats and abuse https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/health-services-are-feeling-the-lasting-effects-of-covid-related-threats-and-abuse/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 04:39:27 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/health-services-are-feeling-the-lasting-effects-of-covid-related-threats-and-abuse/ Threats to Healthcare Workers Bill Don Curtian, director of environmental health for Anne Arundel County, said what he saw was unlike anything else in his 40-year career with the county health department. He said he often feared for the safety of his employees as they enforced COVID restrictions. ANNAPOLIS, Md. – As COVID-19 cases decline […]]]>

As COVID-19 cases decline and restrictions are lifted, health officials say they are still feeling the impact of abusive and threatening behavior over the past two years.

Don Curtian, director of environmental health for Anne Arundel County, said what he saw was unlike anything else in his 40-year career with the county health department. He said he often feared for the safety of his employees as they enforced COVID restrictions.

“When I have to call the police to get my staff to safety, that will always stick with me. I don’t want to have a conversation with any of my employees’ spouses or their families to tell them they haven’t returned home home because they were doing their job,” Curtian said.

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The health department shared video of an inspector who Curtian said was enforcing the county’s mask mandate at a business and began recording when she felt threatened.

In it, a woman tries to slap the phone out of the employee’s hand and a man continues to insult and berate her while police stand by.

Curtian said another employee was surrounded in his car outside a restaurant. Someone photographed it and posted its photo and name on social media calling it a piece of s—.

“There’s a lot of scar tissue,” Curtian said. “The comments, you know, that you see on social media about how the public or locals think of you, it sticks with you.”

Anne Arundel County Health Officer Dr. Nilesh Kalyanaraman said her home address was shared online.

“There were times, yes, I feared for my safety and also thought about the safety of my family,” Kalyanaraman said.

He said it wasn’t just those against COVID restrictions who were being abusive. Kalyanaraman said the toughest time of the pandemic was when vaccines first came out and some didn’t want to wait their turn.

“It sometimes came from different directions. It wasn’t always about doing less, but about doing more and doing better,” he said.

Across the country, there has been an exodus of public health jobs due to multiple factors related to the pandemic.

“We’ve definitely seen turnover increase. We’ve seen more people leave,” Kalyanaraman said. “And we know it’s a combination of all of the above. There’s violence, but there’s also just the hours, the stress, the fatigue. It’s cost us as a service of health.”

New Maryland bill could criminalize threats against healthcare workers

In an effort to bolster public health officials, Maryland lawmakers are considering a bill that would make it a crime to threaten health officials.

House Bill 267 imposes penalties of up to $500 and 90 days in jail for those who utter or send “a threat to a public health official with the intent to intimidate, interfere with or obstruct a public health official public health to carry out its functions”. The crime would be a misdemeanor.

At the January hearing, Washington County Health Officer Earl Stoner said he installed a security system in his home after threatening his family. Dr. Travis Gayles, the former Montgomery County health officer, has shared a racist and explicit email he received during his tenure as health officer.

The bill stalled in committee, but a spokesperson for Del. Karen Lewis Young (D-Frederick), one of the bill’s sponsors, says there’s still hope it will pass this session.

“A bill like this helps send a message,” Kalyanaraman said.

“We shouldn’t be threatened with doing our job,” Curtian said.

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ND Health Department Distributes Free At-Home COVID-19 Testing Statewide https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/nd-health-department-distributes-free-at-home-covid-19-testing-statewide/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 18:05:41 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/nd-health-department-distributes-free-at-home-covid-19-testing-statewide/ BISMARCK, ND — The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) announced today that it will make more than 1.5 million COVID-19 home test kits available statewide. Home testing kits, which were ordered by NDDoH with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, have started arriving in the state. The program is intended to supplement the […]]]>

BISMARCK, ND — The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) announced today that it will make more than 1.5 million COVID-19 home test kits available statewide.

Home testing kits, which were ordered by NDDoH with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, have started arriving in the state. The program is intended to supplement the current federal program to distribute free tests.

Test kits are being distributed statewide and will be free to pick up starting Tuesday, February 15. Citizens are recommended to take the tests as needed, with a start of two tests per household member.

Many health districts and county public health offices have already sent out press releases indicating their intention to distribute the free test kits in their areas.

People who want to pick up these free test kits can find a location near them through the NDDoH website at: http://health.nd.gov/covidtesting — located in the “test locations” table. This table will be updated twice a week as more locations receive home test shipments.

Two types of tests arrived within the framework of these first orders. These include Celltrion which is licensed for people 14 years and older and iHealth which is licensed for people 2 years and older.

There are no home tests allowed for children under 2; children this age should be tested at a community testing site or clinic.

Individuals do not need to report their home test results to the NDDoH, as the department cannot validate results from home test kits. Those who need a validated result or letter for official purposes should request a test from a health care provider or local public health testing site.

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Why New Mexico needs the 100% Family Center https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/why-new-mexico-needs-the-100-family-center/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 10:38:29 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/why-new-mexico-needs-the-100-family-center/ Bill Soules | Your view During this 30-day legislative session for New Mexico, as we still navigate an unpredictable pandemic, adjusting to disruptions to our health care, education and local economies, I focus on priorities . There is nothing more important to me than the health, safety and education of our children, which is why […]]]>

During this 30-day legislative session for New Mexico, as we still navigate an unpredictable pandemic, adjusting to disruptions to our health care, education and local economies, I focus on priorities .

There is nothing more important to me than the health, safety and education of our children, which is why I led the charge in creating the 100% New Mexico Initiative, a program across the state that allows county leaders to ensure access to ten essential services, including medical care, mental health care, home security programs, food security programs and transportation. Through this initiative, we know that families continue to struggle to access these resources, with nearly half reporting significant difficulty accessing what we call the “ten vital services to thrive and survive.”

We can no longer say, “New Mexico supports families with life-changing support services,” if those services are completely inaccessible. This crisis for New Mexico families demands action from all of us at the Roundhouse, which is why I sponsored Senate Bill (SB) 211 to fund a groundbreaking project called 100% Family Center. It will be a one-stop service center for family members, connecting them to parenting support, early learning programs, health care, pantries, job training and education. other vital services. Some services will be offered on site, others on the Web, and all will be accessible to parents. At each step, families will be supported by center navigators who are local service experts and have assessed what services are actually available locally.

Not only will the 100% Family Center connect parents to existing services, but the staff will include project developers whose job would be to identify the limitations of local services and figure out how to remove those barriers. Through this, we move service providers from their familiar position of simply administering services to finding ways to scale them, which is one of the many reasons the All-Family Center is revolutionary. Through SB211, this one-of-a-kind center will be developed and piloted in Las Cruces, a Doña Ana Resilience Leaders project led by Mayor of Las Cruces, Pro Tem Kasandra Gandara.

Senate Bill 211 funds a very timely and urgent project. The 100% Family Center can serve as a model for building health and self-sufficiency for all of New Mexico’s 33 counties. This initiative is a powerful and innovative approach to building back better, with children and families as the number one priority. In the midst of a hectic legislative session filled with conflicting agendas, I am proud to represent a state government led by a committed governor whose agencies are working tirelessly for families. SB 211 is an example of lawmakers and stakeholders, at all levels of government, innovating and uniting for the health, safety and empowerment of all of our children, parents and grandparents. The return on investment of a 100% Family Center, in these turbulent times, has never been so clear.

Bill Soules, PhD, is an educator and state senator from New Mexico. To learn more about the 100% Family Center meeting the needs of families, visit https://www.100nm.org/.

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Count the Kicks campaign to fight stillbirths expands to Arizona https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/count-the-kicks-campaign-to-fight-stillbirths-expands-to-arizona/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 17:31:09 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/count-the-kicks-campaign-to-fight-stillbirths-expands-to-arizona/ Published on February 11, 2022 at 7:25 a.m. Kaila Mellos Cronkite News While pregnant with her second child 12 years ago, Shawn Soumilas started having labor and thought she was giving birth. But the pain was excruciating and she knew something was wrong. “I called my doctor and she was like, ‘Let’s go and head […]]]>

Kaila Mellos

Cronkite News

While pregnant with her second child 12 years ago, Shawn Soumilas started having labor and thought she was giving birth. But the pain was excruciating and she knew something was wrong.

“I called my doctor and she was like, ‘Let’s go and head to the OB-GYN triage unit. “”

It was the day before the 4th of July and Scottsdale Hospital was busy. Then a shift change happened. A new nurse was supposed to perform a biophysical profile on the baby, checking heart rate, breathing and movement, but, Soumilas said, she neglected to do so.

“I was a pebble under his shoe,” recalls Soumilas. “She kept telling me I was dehydrated because it’s July in Scottsdale.”

Things quickly deteriorated. Hospital staff sent Soumilas for an ultrasound, but the technician then told her they needed her for triage, without saying why. While waiting to be transported, Soumilas is seized with nausea.

“My husband told me later, that’s when he felt like I was starting to die.”

Back at triage, Soumilas was greeted by a wall of doctors shouting, “Is that her? Is it her?”

They rushed her to an operating room and inserted an IV. Before sinking completely, Soumilas remembers shouting: “Please take care of my baby.

When she woke up the next day, she asked her nurse, “Where’s my baby?” But she didn’t have to wait for an answer to realize the worst had happened.

“I could tell in his eyes that he was gone.”

Made with Flourish

Count kicks, help moms

Soumilas later learned that she had suffered a rare complication called placental abruption, in which the placenta separates from the uterine wall before birth – sometimes depriving an unborn child of oxygen and causing internal bleeding in the mother.

“I lost three times my blood volume,” she recalls, “and needed blood, plasma and platelet transfusions. They told my husband that I had about a 30% chance of having the operation.

By the time doctors got to the baby, he had gone too long without oxygen. Soumilas lost his son, Zachary, at 38 weeks.

As she recovered, Soumilas began researching everything she could about stillbirth, and one thing struck her. A symptom of placental abruption is decreased fetal movement, and two days before losing her baby she had reported to doctors that she hadn’t felt much movement.

“I was told to lie on my side, drink some juice, see if he straightens up. So I did that,” she said. “I was told, ‘Her due date is almost up; he is probably settling in for the birth. And that doesn’t happen. They don’t stop moving.

“If I had… followed his patterns, I would have known something had changed.” If I had been there two days earlier, he would have been alive.

Soumilas eventually discovered a campaign called Count the Kicks, dedicated to teaching pregnant women about fetal movement and tracking the health of their unborn children. The effort grew out of the nonprofit Healthy Birth Day, started in 2008 in Iowa by five mothers who all lost their daughters to stillbirth or infant death.

Working with state health agencies, the organization is providing a free app or flipchart to help expectant mothers track their baby’s movements during the third trimester so that if they detect any unexpected changes, they’ll can seek help immediately.

The campaign, already in 14 states, is expanding to Arizona this month. The Arizona Department of Health Services partners with Count the Kicks to provide educational materials in multiple languages ​​to healthcare providers, birthing centers and others on the journey of a future. mom.

“Too many people believe that stillbirth cannot be prevented. We strongly disagree,” said Emily Price, executive director of Count the Kicks. In 2010, Price noticed her baby’s movements had slowed, but because she tracked them, she alerted her doctor and her son, Hayden, was born healthy.

Stillbirth is the death of a fetus at 20 weeks or older during pregnancy. Causes can include infections, birth defects, lifestyle, or problems with the umbilical cord or placenta, as Soumilas experienced.

Stillbirths have declined in the United States over the past 15 years. Still, nearly 22,000 were recorded in 2019, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The most at-risk mothers are black women, those 35 and older, women who smoke during pregnancy, and those with health conditions like diabetes and obesity. But they are not alone.

“Hispanic women are at higher risk,” Price said. “Indigenous women are more at risk. And it is totally unacceptable that in 2022 we are losing babies to stillbirth at the rate we are.

New research also shows that women with COVID-19 at the time of childbirth are at greater risk of stillbirth. A CDC study found that among 1,249,634 deliveries from March 2020 to September 2021, stillbirths occurred in 0.65% of deliveries. But among those who had COVID-19 at the time of delivery, the stillbirth rate was 1.26%.

Arizona recorded nearly 500 stillbirths in 2019, the latest data available, with stark disparities among women of color.

“It’s a much bigger problem in Native American communities, as well as African American communities,” said Angie Lorenzo, who directs the office of women’s health at the state Department of Health Services. “Those are the two most affected by this.”

Experts examining these disparities note that in many cases the cause of death is not even documented, but they point to aggravating factors, including access to good health care, institutional biases and differences in health care. health before and during pregnancy.

“Racial disparities definitely persist,” said Stephaney Moody, health equity coordinator at Count the Kicks. “We don’t have conversations. It’s not easy to get, but it’s something I’m not afraid to do.

Warning signs – and solutions

Although lack of fetal movement is a warning sign of potential problems, experts disagree on whether kick counting is directly correlated with fewer stillbirths.

A 2009 study in the journal BMC Pregnancy Childbirth that reviewed previous research on fetal movement monitoring found evidence of an impact on stillbirths in high-risk pregnancies, but recommended that more studies be conducted to determine the effect of universal fetal movement monitoring.

Another review in 2021 agreed that further studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of various methods of monitoring fetal movements, but noted that “monitoring fetal movement counts is a low-cost, low-tech method that has the potential to prevent worsening of problems with unborn babies and deserves the attention of providers and pregnant women.

Count the Kicks also undertakes its own research. Researchers from Des Moines University and the Harkin Institute for Public Policy & Citizen Engagement surveyed 809 women who used the Count the Kicks app and determined that users increased their knowledge of movement patterns and were more likely to be seen by a physician for decreased fetal movement.

The app developed by Count the Kicks works with moms-to-be to track how long it takes to feel 10 movements, including kicks and rolls. Count the Kicks has also developed a paper form to track moves and average them out.

“Every baby and every pregnancy is different,” Moody said. “Maybe it would take my baby 10 minutes to get the 10 kicks…but it takes your baby 45 minutes. The key is knowing what’s ‘normal’.”

In Arizona, the health department and Count the Kicks are working to specifically target underserved communities and women of color. Materials are available in English and Spanish, and Moody and Lorenzo said the goal is to provide Navajo brochures, posters and enforcement reminder cards as well.

The Department of Health Services is partnering with Diné College of the Navajo Nation and South Phoenix Healthy Start, a provider for women of color, to help raise awareness of the effort.

Moody said she hopes to see a decline in stillbirths in the state by introducing the program “not only to expectant parents, but also to maternal health workers and providers who are in the state.”

Tribute to Zach

After volunteering with Count the Kicks, Soumilas now represents Arizona as an ambassador for the organization – to share her story and raise awareness of the campaign. She connects with groups and hospitals that treat pregnant women, and is encouraged that the partnership with AZDHS will bring additional attention.

Today, Soumilas, 48, lives in Prescott with her husband, Theo, and 13-year-old son, Ian. But Zach is still in his heart.

“It will always be hard to know that Zach is meant to be by Ian’s side during all of our memorable family moments,” she said. “When I was pregnant with Zach, I felt a sense of peace that they would always be together in life.”

And every day she works to honor her son through her work with Count the Kicks.

“If you see a change, you need to talk about it…Don’t wait until tomorrow,” she said. “Having this conversation is extremely important for women to know that you are the one who is empowered to do this for you.”

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Remarks by Ambassador Degnan to the Ministry of Health media https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/remarks-by-ambassador-degnan-to-the-ministry-of-health-media/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 04:08:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/remarks-by-ambassador-degnan-to-the-ministry-of-health-media/ It was a pleasure to meet Minister Azarashvili and his new Deputy today to talk about the COVID situation in Georgia, but also many other issues – important issues which are covered by this Minister. For 30 years, the United States has worked closely with the Georgia Department of Health on public health issues, including […]]]>

It was a pleasure to meet Minister Azarashvili and his new Deputy today to talk about the COVID situation in Georgia, but also many other issues – important issues which are covered by this Minister. For 30 years, the United States has worked closely with the Georgia Department of Health on public health issues, including eliminating hepatitis C, immunization programs, improving health care for mothers and children and, in general, improving the capacity of the Georgian public health system. . One thing I would like to say: we have been discussing the COVID situation and the sharp increase in cases here in Georgia over the past two weeks, and I would just like to urge Georgians again: get vaccinated, get vaccinated. a reminder. It has been shown around the world to be safe, highly effective and life saving. We look at 15,000 Georgians who have lost their lives to COVID. Getting your loved ones and yourself vaccinated is so important, so I hope Georgians will go for it. The ministry has excellent programs in place to make it easier for Georgians to access good health care and vaccinations. Again, this is the safest and most effective way to protect against COVID. We also work with the ministry in a number of other areas, including improving the working situation of workers and, of course, improving the situation of displaced people and those in the occupied territories. Thus, the United States looks forward to continuing its long and strong partnership with the Department of Health. We have 30 years of good work behind us, and we expect many more in the years to come.

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Dr. KaNisha L. Hall appreciates the opportunity to touch lives https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dr-kanisha-l-hall-appreciates-the-opportunity-to-touch-lives/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 15:03:16 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dr-kanisha-l-hall-appreciates-the-opportunity-to-touch-lives/ Photo courtesy of Deira Lacy Dr. KaNisha L. Hall is an anesthesiologist, sexologist, addiction medicine counselor, published author, and media personality. She is proud to be an alumnus of Howard University and an advocate for HBCU. Hall lobbies to end health care disparities and advocates for women’s health rights. Tell us about your trip. What […]]]>

Photo courtesy of Deira Lacy

Dr. KaNisha L. Hall is an anesthesiologist, sexologist, addiction medicine counselor, published author, and media personality. She is proud to be an alumnus of Howard University and an advocate for HBCU. Hall lobbies to end health care disparities and advocates for women’s health rights.

Tell us about your trip. What has changed for you with the advent of COVID?

One of my favorite places is labor and delivery, where I do epidurals for women as they are about to allow life into this world. This place has been a safe haven for me to remind myself that no matter what, these babies are coming. There is an even greater new level of caution as sadly we are now seeing COVID positive moms and waiting for their brand new babies to see if they are going to test positive or not. It’s a whole new world out there. I so value my opportunities and my ability to touch lives and be part of this health care system. But it changed my way of practicing. Every day I literally see life and death. I see people being born. And I see people taking their exit. And it’s difficult, but I do my best to do self-checks.

What should the black community do to address manageable illnesses or weight loss?

I love that people want to know what they should be doing, not just about COVID, but how to be better and how to be healthier. We had an entire panel to talk about food, desserts and how we can incorporate food markets and black-owned grocery stores and fresh produce into these food desserts to help people live healthier lives. , and I feel like there’s a drive out there, and there’s a desire to be better.

Continue reading on the next page.

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