high school – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 00:00:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png high school – Sister Friends Together http://www.sisterfriends-together.org/ 32 32 Women in Construction: A Look at Leadership in Action https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/women-in-construction-a-look-at-leadership-in-action/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 00:00:41 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/women-in-construction-a-look-at-leadership-in-action/ When I started in construction over 16 years ago, less than 9% of the industry was made up of women. Today, women still represent only 11% of all people working in construction. As we celebrate Women in Construction (WIC) Week, I reflect on how far we have come and the opportunities that lie ahead, especially […]]]>

When I started in construction over 16 years ago, less than 9% of the industry was made up of women. Today, women still represent only 11% of all people working in construction. As we celebrate Women in Construction (WIC) Week, I reflect on how far we have come and the opportunities that lie ahead, especially as our industry continues to be challenged to meet its growing needs. in manpower.

For me, WIC Week is more than just a week about celebrating women’s impact and accomplishments, it’s about creating action and opportunities for more women to consider pursuing a career in construction. There has never been a better time to shine a light on the impactful work of women in construction and how rewarding construction careers can be. I hope that by sharing my story and that of others, more women will see that they too can thrive here.


READ ALSO: CRE’s Most Influential Women: Antonya Williams


I love telling the story of my beginnings in construction, and it all starts with my father. I started working with him in the family business of residential and commercial construction, doing whatever was necessary – transporting materials, installing finishing work, writing specifications and managing office work. It not only introduced me to the industry, but also taught me a strong work ethic that I enjoy building.

Antonya Williams, executive vice president of McCarthy Building Companies.

This passion drove me to complete my construction management degree and take on an operations role with McCarthy in Northern California, which exposed me to the complex and challenging construction of healthcare and education. Not only did I cut my teeth on big construction jobs, but I saw the impact these projects had on my community. My interest in connecting personally with customers and communities grew and I pursued another opportunity in my company. With management support, I made the decision to move from California to Arizona to work for Justin Kelton in our Southwest region.. It was no small decision for me, but when he pledged to “let me run” I knew it was the right decision and never looked back.

Although my career path is not what many consider traditional, it has provided personal and professional growth at every turn through challenges and learning opportunities. Throughout it all, I had incredible support from many mentors. Experiencing the success that came with this support gave me a deep passion for mentoring others, especially women.

In honor of WIC week, I would like to recognize several pioneering women. They inspire others every day through mentorship, training and community involvement.

Mentoring Matters

I strongly believe in the importance of mentoring. I met my mentor Chuck early in my career. He taught me to intentionally set goals and work towards them and to build a strong network at work and in the community. I followed his advice and with the help of other mentors along the way, I learned not to be afraid of failure and the importance of showing up for others. Thanks to the male and female mentors I have had over the years, I have a mentorship model that I strive to share with others.

One of my mentees is Cierra, who I connected with through Big Brothers Big Sisters. I’ve been his Big for over 11 years and although we now live in different states, we’ve established a lifelong relationship. Last year, she graduated from high school as a valedictorian, overcoming a lot to earn this honor. Additionally, I have had the honor of supporting mentoring programs such as New Pathways For Youth (NPFY) and ACE Mentoring.

Thanks to NPFY, I have seen the remarkable impact of our industry. Several of my partners mentor young people through this program, including Michaela Rempkowski. I had the pleasure of working with Michaela and am proud of how she drives it forward by serving as a mentor. Young people really benefit from being involved Michaela and other members of our team and the construction industry share their experience, support and encouragement. Maybe some will be inspired to join us in the construction industry.

With ACE Mentorship, our industry has introduced and supported young people pursuing careers in architecture, construction and engineering. During COVID, we remodeled our program and expanded it statewide, more than tripling the number of participants.

We know these programs work. We see the impact one person at a time. As vice president of ACE Arizona, I personally mentored several women, including Sydney, whom I met through the program. She now works at Amazon in design and research. Blanca, who also went through ACE, is currently pursuing a degree in mechanical engineering at Rice University.

Community impact

The generosity of many members of our industry continually impresses me. I have seen individuals, teams and partners stepping in to help by supporting families and organizations in need.

Recently, McCarthy’s Heart Hats volunteers and business partners supported the construction of Kaylee’s Playground. Kaylee is an 8-year-old girl with a rare genetic mutation that caused her to lose her ability to walk and talk. Her family needed help building ramps so she could play with her siblings on their playground.

Charity Carr, another construction leader who is doing remarkable things including building healthcare facilities, took immediate action to help Kaylee’s family after hearing their story. Charity led the volunteer effort to transform the family’s backyard playground into a wheelchair-accessible wonderland by adding a wheelchair lift, specially adapted swing set, new sidewalks, paint and artificial grass.

Charity impacts the lives of others in our community. Her compassion and energy raises awareness of the challenges families face and engages others in meaningful ways.

Lighting the Way for a Construction Career Path

For years, our industry has worked to engage the next generation in construction through programs such as Construction Career Days (CCD) and Build your Future Arizona. These programs offer young people an opportunity to learn more about construction and the potential of a career in construction.

Through partnerships with these and other organizations, McCarthy engages students in hands-on training at our Innovation and Craftsmanship Center (ICWC), a state-of-the-art craftsmanship training facility dedicated to assist the next generation craft workforce and those currently in the trades with the development and advancement of their skills. It also provides hands-on training and real-world application for our in-house precast operations.

Those who attend ICWC programs will likely meet Amber Shepard, McCarthy’s Self-Execution Manager, who facilitates craft training programs at ICWC. With her experience and deep perspective in the trades, Amber’s relationships with project superintendents help meet current and future needs in the field. She is also well known for her involvement with CCD and the Arizona Builders Alliance (ABA) where her passion for the trades has encouraged others to consider this rewarding career path.

Another program supporting women in construction is that of the ABA Women in Leadership Program. A recent participant in the program is Tuyet Jacobson, who started at McCarthy as an intern and is now a senior project manager. Tuyet’s introduction to construction helped his father with home improvement projects. At ASU, she was introduced to the construction program and realized that was the career she wanted to pursue. Eight years ago, I was able to introduce him offer letter to join McCarthy and she joined our solar preconstruction team. Tuyet moved to the educational services group where she is thriving.

It runs educational projects and takes the opportunity to support young people interested in the construction industry through the Del E. Webb Construction School Alumni Association and CACTUS (Careers in Architecture, Construction and Trades Uplifting Students). Tuyet has inspired me since our first meeting, and I’m proud to see her grow and flourish professionally and personally.

Rumor spreads among the women that the construction is a great place. In fact, over 40% of McCarthy’s summer interns this year are women!

Initiatives like WIC week have an impact. I encourage everyone in the industry to pass on this week’s messages to the other 51 weeks of the year. Women, alongside our male counterparts, not only help bridge the workforce gap, but also bring skills, perspective, leadership and community engagement to the industry. I believe that together we all do better.

Antonya Williams is executive vice president of McCarthy Building Companies.

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Philly’s health department admits the city is much less vaccinated against COVID-19 than it says https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/phillys-health-department-admits-the-city-is-much-less-vaccinated-against-covid-19-than-it-says/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 23:03:45 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/phillys-health-department-admits-the-city-is-much-less-vaccinated-against-covid-19-than-it-says/ Philadelphia’s vaccination rates are significantly lower than the Department of Public Health said, officials acknowledged Wednesday, blaming data errors for the inflated numbers. More importantly, only a third of children in Philadelphia between the ages of 5 and 11 have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, far less than the 53.6% officials […]]]>

Philadelphia’s vaccination rates are significantly lower than the Department of Public Health said, officials acknowledged Wednesday, blaming data errors for the inflated numbers.

More importantly, only a third of children in Philadelphia between the ages of 5 and 11 have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, far less than the 53.6% officials announced for weeks.

About 26% of those children are fully immunized, the health department said in a news release Wednesday, the first day children could attend public schools in the city without masks.

Adult vaccination rates have also been inflated: About three-quarters of Philadelphians 18 and older are fully vaccinated, down from the 82% that had been reported.

“No one is more disappointed with this error than we are, but we have corrected it and instituted new measures to ensure that any future issues are detected before they are triggered,” said Cheryl Bettigole, commissioner at the health of the city.

Bettigole and his top aides knew publicly available vaccination rates were incorrect on Feb. 16, spokesman James Garrow said. Yet they dropped the city’s indoor mask requirement last week before rates were fixed. Vaccination rates, however, did not play a role in changing the rules, Garrow said.

“The reason we didn’t think about it was, as we’ve said throughout the pandemic, the vaccination rate, we don’t have a target percentage to hit,” he said. he declares. “From our perspective, vaccination rates have nothing to do with our mandates because … we want the mandates to be based on what actually happens to the virus on the ground.”

The number of cases, positivity rates, hospitalizations and case increases, based on the referral system recently released by the health department, are the determining factors, he said.

READ MORE: Far fewer Philadelphia children could be vaccinated against COVID-19 than the city has said

Garrow acknowledged that data errors won’t help build credibility among city residents who are already skeptical of vaccination.

“Trust is paramount in this industry and it is unfortunate that this has happened,” he said.

The city added a second epidemiology team to review the data and instituted a monthly snapshot of immunization data to accompany the weekly data checks that were routine. It also changed the way vaccination rates are presented on the public dashboard to ensure the error doesn’t happen again, Garrow said. The raw vaccination numbers on the city’s dashboard are correct, Garrow said. Only the vaccination rates were wrong.

Ala Stanford, a pediatric surgeon and founder of the Black Doctors’ COVID-19 Consortium, said she’s not surprised the city’s pediatric vaccination rates are incorrect.

“I’ve been in elementary and high school since January 18,” she said. “I see the questions being asked. I see the holes in education. And I still see parents who have not endorsed and embraced the idea of ​​vaccination with their children.

COVID case rates are so low right now that she didn’t believe the risk of school exposure was significant. But low vaccination rates among children will be concerning if another COVID surge occurs.

The news comes as children attended city schools unmasked for the first time in nearly two years. Making masks optional has had mixed results. At a district high school, a teacher said most of her students still wore masks; only about 30% chose to remove them. At Beeber’s Science Leadership Academy, a 7- to 12-year-old school in West Philadelphia, virtually everyone kept their masks on. Sanai Browning, a senior, said she saw maybe 10 students who weren’t wearing masks.

“I kept mine,” Browning, 18, said. “I always like to keep it. I just like to keep everyone around me safe.

Elkin Elementary in Kensington asked for parental permission before allowing children to unmask. Few families wanted their children’s masks removed, a teacher said.

Bettigole reiterated that unmasking is safe.

“The number of people testing positive for COVID in Philadelphia is rapidly approaching the lowest we’ve ever seen,” Bettigole said. “Because our number of cases is so low and falling, we feel it is safe enough for people to unmask indoors, including in schools.”

The city did not explain why the adult vaccination rate was incorrect, but said the pediatric vaccination rate was skewed in the process of integrating data on Philadelphians vaccinated in other Pennsylvania counties earlier this year, Garrow said.

In December, the state shared its records with Philadelphia, leaving the city with hundreds of thousands of duplicate vaccine records. These were supposed to be taken into account when the data was entered into the city’s dashboard on January 26, but for children aged 5 to 11, this was not the case. Garrow said he didn’t know why this age group alone included duplicate records.

“They just missed it,” he said. “It was a mistake.”

Garrow said he didn’t know when the problem was first identified, but said someone noticed the errors during a routine checkup and it was brought to Bettigole’s attention. February 16. The delay in updating public data was due to a revision effort. the data before correcting it.

At that time, Garrow said, the city stopped updating the vaccination rate as new vaccination records came in, but did not note the incorrect number while it conducted a review.

READ MORE: Fractured record keeping leaves Philadelphia hospitals unsure of vaccinated patients

The health department first acknowledged its review on Friday after an analysis by the Inquirer raised questions about the accuracy of the pediatric vaccination rate.

Coordinating immunization data has been a headache for public agencies from the start. State, federal and local record-keeping systems are not compatible, and in the absence of a national vaccine database, some data entry is done manually, Garrow said.

“There’s definitely an internal frustration here,” Garrow said.

Writer Kasturi Pananjary contributed to this story.

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Volunteers help create a Holocaust memorial https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/volunteers-help-create-a-holocaust-memorial/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 06:45:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/volunteers-help-create-a-holocaust-memorial/ The Jewish Center of Bakersfield is creating a Holocaust memorial to help remember the six million Jews who lost their lives during this time. Community members step in to make this possible and have delivered on this promise. “It makes me feel good because I’m not here for myself, I’m really there for everyone,” said […]]]>

The Jewish Center of Bakersfield is creating a Holocaust memorial to help remember the six million Jews who lost their lives during this time. Community members step in to make this possible and have delivered on this promise.

“It makes me feel good because I’m not here for myself, I’m really there for everyone,” said Cathy Lu of the National Honor Society of Stockdale High School. She and her peers were among the Chabad Sunday morning volunteers who helped sort out the buttons to build the memorial.

Each button represents a life lost in the Holocaust to visually show the colossal impact of the Holocaust, so the exhibit will consist of 6 million buttons. Esther Schlanger of the Chabad of Bakersfield says almost all the buttons have been collected, but now need to be stored and cleaned before putting them in the boxes for display.

“It’s a community project. the buttons were collected from the community, it’s built with community funds, and we’re all in this together. It’s for the community, the community of Bakersfield, to remember the victims of the holocaust, so we’re all doing it together,” Schlanger said.

She says it’s important to create this memorial with buttons to show each individual life and ensure they are never forgotten.

“People like you and me live their lives and then get wiped out,” she adds. “There’s no one to remember them because whole communities perish, even as we sort them out, we remember because we count, we touch, we remember and that’s very powerful.”

Volunteers sorted the buttons by plastic, glass, rubber, wood, pearl and other material. This way the buttons don’t interact with each other and rot when placed in the containers.

This was Skye Dent’s first time volunteering with button sorting. “It was very fun.” She says it’s important to volunteer with opportunities like these because it helps you learn about and understand other religions better. She hopes more people will come out and support the effort, saying it’s easy to get started.

“I just walked in the door and they just gave me a box of 5,000 buttons. Come down and they’ll show you how to be supportive.

Schlanger says they hope the memorial will be open to the public in the fall. And in the meantime, say they can use all the help they can get to make this possible. “Grateful for everyone who has since come out and everyone planning to come out, we are incredibly grateful,” she said.

Everyone is invited to volunteer. If you want more details, you can call the Chabad of Bakersfield at (661) 834-1512 or email info@chabadofbakersfield.com.

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Dimples, Iya and Neri talk about how they get me time https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dimples-iya-and-neri-talk-about-how-they-get-me-time/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 16:01:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/dimples-iya-and-neri-talk-about-how-they-get-me-time/ SHOWBIZ moms may have more resources at their disposal than most moms, but it’s also amazing how they manage to juggle all the roles they take on in real, real life. Dimples Romana, for example, is busy being the mother of her children and the wife of her husband Boyet, her acting […]]]>


Column Box-Dinna Chan Vasquez-And Then Some

SHOWBIZ moms may have more resources at their disposal than most moms, but it’s also amazing how they manage to juggle all the roles they take on in real, real life.

Dimples Romana, for example, is busy being the mother of her children and the wife of her husband Boyet, her acting career and brand endorsements, among other things. But she still finds the time to take short courses to improve.

“I want to gear up better when I talk about brands I endorse and represent,” the 37-year-old said.

Besides self-improvement, one of Dimple’s gifts to herself is a healthier lifestyle.

“I’ve learned that when trying to lead a healthier life, it has to start with small steps.”

She admitted that sometimes she can spread out too much and it got to a point where she wanted to keep a low profile after finishing the soap opera. Kadenang Ginto. “I have worked since I was young. I got married young. It’s so easy to burn out, so I really made an effort to be healthy. It really helped me,” Dimples said during the online media event to officially introduce her as the new Health Barley Max endorser.

Health Barley Max is barley grass harvested at a young age and produced in powder and capsule form. The barley grass powder used for Santé Barley Max is certified organic by BioGro, New Zealand’s largest and best-known certifier for organic products and products. Health Barley Max comes in capsule and powder form. Dimples usually drinks the powder dissolved in water.

“I’ve been drinking Santé Barley Max for a year and I’m very happy with it,” said Dimples.

We also caught up with two other showbiz moms — Iya Villania Arellano and Neri Naig Miranda — at an event for baby products brand Babyflo.

Iya and her husband Drew Arellano have three children with another little one on the way, while Neri and Chito Miranda have two children and will soon adopt Neri’s niece, Pia.

At the launch of baby products brand Babyflo’s #SayaNgAlagangBabyflo campaign, Iya and Neri thanked their husbands for giving them the support they need to be effective mothers and housewives.

“I have an exceptionally supportive husband. He helps make sure I have time for myself when I need it,” Neri said.

She said that Chito even tells the kids that “mom needs some time to herself” when she’s in the room and they want to come in.

Iya said she is very low maintenance when it comes to caring for her hair and skin.

“I actually don’t like the time I have to spend going to the salon. It takes about four hours, and that’s why I love having easy-to-maintain hair.

What she needs time for is her fitness routine.

“I’m happy to do my daily training and it’s for me all the daily time I need. When I feel like I need an extra boost, I occasionally schedule lunch with a friend, along with shopping therapy on the side. But that only happens about once or twice a month, so it’s easy to fit that into my schedule,” Iya said.

During the event, Babyflo launched its new look with playful designs. I would just like to share that Babyflo’s Baby Blue Eau de Toilette has been a favorite since I was in high school and I’m glad to see that even though the packaging is now different, it still smells so good.



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Shane Thompson: Supporting Sustainable Livelihoods https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/shane-thompson-supporting-sustainable-livelihoods/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 17:44:54 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/shane-thompson-supporting-sustainable-livelihoods/ Check on delivery Mr. Chairman, traditional ways of life are a very important part of the social, cultural and economic fabric of communities in the Northwest Territories. Traditional livelihoods help keep cultures strong and sustain practices on the land. This supports food security, provides individuals with valuable income-earning opportunities, and sustains a strong traditional economy […]]]>

Check on delivery

Mr. Chairman, traditional ways of life are a very important part of the social, cultural and economic fabric of communities in the Northwest Territories.

Traditional livelihoods help keep cultures strong and sustain practices on the land. This supports food security, provides individuals with valuable income-earning opportunities, and sustains a strong traditional economy throughout the territory. Supporting sustainable livelihoods is a high priority for our government, and today I would like to highlight some of the investments and achievements that we are very proud of. Mr. Speaker, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources has expanded its programs this year to strengthen existing support for people to access land-based activities and continue traditional practices.

ENR worked closely with the Department of Education, Culture and Employment to adapt the existing Hunter Education Program, which is now offered as a credit program in NWT high schools. This program, developed in partnership with Indigenous governments, Indigenous organizations and respected anglers, places safety and respect at the center of the training offered to new young anglers. Current high school students, who will be the next generation of anglers, will take the new course this winter in a pilot program at nine NWT schools.

Mr. Speaker, we know that supporting culture is also important for healing. ENR worked with the Department of Justice to develop a trapper training program that will be offered to inmates at the North Slave Correctional Centre. This training will help participants become familiar with trapping regulations, the Authentic Mackenzie Valley Fur Program, how to set traps and prepare pelts, and a variety of field and survival skills. It is not only an opportunity to reconnect with traditional ways of life, but also to develop practical skills that participants can use when they return to their communities. Although the rollout of this program has been delayed due to COVID-19, we look forward to starting offering this new program soon.

Mr. Speaker, we also continued to help families settle in the territory through many new and existing programs.

In January, ENR provided nearly $180,000 for 17 projects under the second installment of the Take a Family On the Land program. This funding will support 17 organizations to help people get out into the field with the person they consider family.

Mr. Chairman, the GNWT also continues to support the NWT On the Land Collaborative, which brings together government, charitable, corporate and other partners to provide financial support for projects throughout the NWT that promote the development of traditional skills on Earth. In 2022, the NWT On the Land Collaborative will invest nearly $1 million in 54 projects across all regions of the NWT. I would like to acknowledge that the NWT On the Land Collaborative has been recognized by the Canadian Parks and Recreation Association with a partner award for its innovative work. Our government congratulates all partners of the On the Land collaboration for the exceptional work they do each year and for this well-deserved award.

Mr. Chairman, while we are proud of the programs offered by ENR, we recognize the importance of reviewing them regularly to ensure that they continue to effectively support land-based activities.

To that end, we recently spoke with hunters, trappers and other anglers in the Northwest Territories about the Long-Time Community Fisherman’s Assistance Program.

We received valuable feedback on what is working well and where the program can be improved. A What We Heard report, with eight recommendations for improvement, was shared publicly in January 2022. The intent was to solicit additional public feedback to ensure we got it right. ENR is currently working to update some elements of the program and will use the information provided to continue this work.

Mr. Speaker, these investments are intended to help fishers, families and local leaders continue to encourage sustainable lifestyles. I would like to acknowledge the extremely important role of Elders, knowledge holders, Indigenous governments and Indigenous organizations in their efforts to develop traditional activities and ways of life.

Our government will continue to provide support as part of our efforts to strengthen the traditional economy, create employment opportunities in small communities and increase food security for residents of the Northwest Territories.

Thank you, Mr President.

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The Ministry of Health is waiting to make a recommendation on the grass pitch https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/the-ministry-of-health-is-waiting-to-make-a-recommendation-on-the-grass-pitch/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 02:21:26 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/the-ministry-of-health-is-waiting-to-make-a-recommendation-on-the-grass-pitch/ (February 17, 2022) Chief Health Officer Roberto Santamaria said he is trying to keep the Nantucket Health Department neutral for as long as possible in the current debate over PFAS in Nantucket High School’s artificial turf fields. “We will definitely (make a recommendation),” he said, “but it probably won’t be until the April health board […]]]>

(February 17, 2022) Chief Health Officer Roberto Santamaria said he is trying to keep the Nantucket Health Department neutral for as long as possible in the current debate over PFAS in Nantucket High School’s artificial turf fields.

“We will definitely (make a recommendation),” he said, “but it probably won’t be until the April health board meeting.”

Santamaria cited the lack of peer-reviewed scientific data on PFAS in turf fields, and whether it can leach into the surrounding environment, as the reason he wants the health department to collect so many data. information as possible before providing a recommendation for or against. a proposed plan that includes the installation of synthetic grass pitches at the secondary school.

PFAS are a group of extremely prevalent man-made chemicals that have been used in consumer products for decades and are linked to a range of adverse health effects. Although they have been around since the 1940s, they are only beginning to be studied and researched extensively.

“We don’t know if there are other types of PFAS (in the fields) that we can’t measure,” Santamaria said at Thursday’s Health Council meeting. “It’s not good in my opinion, it’s a problem.”

Board member Meri Lepore wanted the board to take a more aggressive stance against turf fields, given a recent town hall meeting held by the school’s committee that included scientists from both sides of the question.

“I think based on the science that we heard (at this meeting), we should take a stand that PFAS is bad and it will go (from the grass) into our water and poison our water,” she said.

But board member Malcolm MacNab, who is a medical researcher, said the lack of peer-reviewed scientific data prevented him from having an opinion.

“You can get away with saying anything without having peer-reviewed literature,” he said. “From a scientific point of view, I have no opinion. It’s hard to vote on anything right now.

To read the full story, pick up the February 10 print edition of The Inquirer and Mirror or subscribe to I&M’s online edition at click here.

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School board approves funding for South Middle School, transferring some programs from Canyon Lake Elementary | Local https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/school-board-approves-funding-for-south-middle-school-transferring-some-programs-from-canyon-lake-elementary-local/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/school-board-approves-funding-for-south-middle-school-transferring-some-programs-from-canyon-lake-elementary-local/ Without any discussion on Tuesday, the Rapid City Area Schools Board of Education unanimously approved two items related to funding options for the construction of a new South High School and the transfer of some students and programs from Canyon Lake Elementary School to other facilities in the district. Tuesday’s board action came after a […]]]>

Without any discussion on Tuesday, the Rapid City Area Schools Board of Education unanimously approved two items related to funding options for the construction of a new South High School and the transfer of some students and programs from Canyon Lake Elementary School to other facilities in the district.

Tuesday’s board action came after a study session last Wednesday found that construction bids for the new college were much higher than expected and the district was looking for creative and cost-effective solutions. for multiple issues with Canyon Lake Elementary’s infrastructure.

According to the funding resolution, the bid for the construction of a new South Middle School was “significantly higher than expected” due to the “extremely high rate of inflation experienced over the past 12 months”.






Southern College


Grace Pritchett Journal Staff


The school district plans to use nearly $47.8 million in Elementary-Secondary School Emergency Funding (ESSER) to build the replacement school. However, the build bid came in at over $61.4 million. Other costs including design/construction administration costs, asbestos removal from existing school building, fixtures, furnishings, equipment, a new sports facility on the east side of campus, soil and concrete testing, permits, utilities, other fees and construction contingencies increased the estimated cost to $68.5 million.

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This estimated cost is $20.7 million higher than the budgeted ESSER funding, causing the school district to seek additional funding options.

“A thorough conversation has taken place with the administration, the Board of Education’s Facilities Committee, and the entire Board of Education regarding this situation,” the resolution reads. “From a financial perspective, the discussion focused on structuring a financial package for the part of the costs that would fall outside of the ESSER budget and that would be most beneficial to the district.”

Proposed financing options include using up to $5 million from the school district’s cash reserve fund and then seeking $15 million from an outside finance company. The school district would issue a certificate to secure funding based on its planned state aid funding, the resolution says.

RCAS facilities manager Kumar Veluswamy wrote a memo to the Board of Education saying the district would also work with the construction contractor to cut costs to keep the construction project below budget estimates. Veluswamy said using “valuable engineering items” could reduce costs by about $1.5 million.

“These value engineering items will be formally issued as a request for proposal to the contractor and a change order will be presented to the CAAN Board of Education to reduce the contract amount,” Veluswamy wrote. “This process will ensure that we award the contract before the 30 day deadline and there will be no gray area for all parties involved in the value engineering process.”

The new South Middle School will comprise 135,000 square feet with a capacity of 800 students. The new building will be located north of the existing school on the same site and will be connected to the existing community center. Construction will begin while the old school is still in operation. Once the new building is completed, students and staff will move into the facility and the old building will be demolished.

Plans call for the new building to have the capacity to increase student capacity in the future by adding a third level to the classroom wings.

The main building at Canyon Lake Elementary School was built in 1949 and an addition was made in 1951. The main building has experienced many infrastructure problems due to the age of the building.

The Canyon Lake site also includes four annexes – the district term for modular buildings that function as free-standing classrooms – that have been in use since the 1980s. A quarter mile from the main building is the Kibben-Kuster Building, which was built in 1981. The school district now calls this building Canyon Lake East.







Canyon Lake Elementary School

Canyon Lake Elementary School


Grace Pritchett Journal Staff


Canyon Lake’s main building had previously been identified for closure due to a variety of factors including high water tables causing indoor air quality issues and structural issues, mechanical system issues, capacity upgrades needed electricity and a poor educational match, the district said.

The building’s HVAC system is over 45 years old and causing problems daily, the district said. The school board on Tuesday approved an emergency declaration to move special education and kindergarten students to Horace Mann Elementary School, the Food Services Administration to the Lincoln Building and the Lakota Immersion Program at General Beadle Elementary School.

The move will be effective from the start of the 2022-2023 school year.

By moving programs to other school sites, the school district will be able to repair portions of the HVAC systems in the common gymnasium/cafeteria area, computer server room, four classrooms, and two restrooms. The estimated cost would be between $250,000 and $280,000.

“This option allows us to keep all current Canyon Lake Elementary students and staff on the same campus,” the emergency declaration reads. “However, due to the current growth and changing population within our school boundaries, we will need to reassess school attendance limits for all schools in the near future.”

Contact Nathan Thompson at nathan.thompson@rapidcityjournal.com.

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Coffee grounds have a second life in the Chemeketa startup farm https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/coffee-grounds-have-a-second-life-in-the-chemeketa-startup-farm/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 19:17:03 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/coffee-grounds-have-a-second-life-in-the-chemeketa-startup-farm/ Three years ago, Salem Dutch Bros. barista Amanda Roberts wondered if her coffee stand could do something with used grounds besides throwing it away. Now she delivers hundreds of pounds a week to local farms for compost. Amanda Roberts, a Dutch Bros. barista. and leader of the “Tulip Team,” drops off coffee grounds for composting […]]]>

Three years ago, Salem Dutch Bros. barista Amanda Roberts wondered if her coffee stand could do something with used grounds besides throwing it away. Now she delivers hundreds of pounds a week to local farms for compost.

Amanda Roberts, a Dutch Bros. barista. and leader of the “Tulip Team,” drops off coffee grounds for composting at the Chemeketa Community College Agricultural Complex on Feb. 10, 2022 (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

Amanda Roberts smiles as she throws a large bag of coffee grounds onto a pile of steaming dirt.

“It was a huge bag, no trash!” she said.

That’s cause for celebration for the Salem barista, who has diverted thousands of pounds of waste soil from the landfill to local compost piles over the past three years.

Roberts works at the booth of Dutch Bros. on Southeast Commercial Street and coordinates the “Tulip Team”, a volunteer effort by Dutch Bros. workers. to deliver compostable coffee grounds to local gardens and small farms.

In January, the group added a new partner to the effort: Chemeketa Community College.

Tim Ray, the college’s dean for agricultural sciences, learned about the project through a former state agent for Future Farmers of America who now works for Dutch Bros.

“All of this would have ended up in the landfill,” he said as he and Roberts added to the pile on a recent Thursday morning.

Ray joined Chemeketa over the summer to lead an expansion of the college’s agricultural programs following the completion of the Agricultural Complex, a multimillion-dollar building and outdoor space on the east side of the college’s Salem campus.

The 5-acre plot includes a one-and-a-half-acre field that Ray plans to use as a hands-on lab for college horticulture students, growing fruits and vegetables starting this summer.

Tim Ray, dean of agricultural science at Chemeketa Community College, adds coffee grounds to a compost pile on Feb. 10, 2022 (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

A challenge for Ray’s growing ambition is the soil on campus, which doesn’t yet have the structure or nutrients for ideal agriculture. He has planted a cover crop, but hopes the compost pile will soon be ready to provide more nutrients before the growing season begins.

“It’s cooking,” he says, walking towards a large pile where coffee grounds mix with food scraps and leaves. Ray had previously measured the battery’s internal temperature at 120 degrees, a sign that the organic matter inside was decomposing.

Roberts now delivers coffee grounds to Chemeketa weekly. On February 10, his transport was about 500 pounds of land in black plastic bags, collected from the nine local Dutch Bros. stands. who participate.

When Salemites are particularly caffeinated, the weekly haul sometimes reaches 900 pounds of coffee grounds, she said.

Roberts studied environmental studies in Southern California before heading north with his girlfriend, exploring Oregon from their van. They broke down in Salem, and she ended up staying, starting to work at the Market Street Dutch Bros. stand. three years ago.

She saw a video on social media of a Scottish company recycling coffee grounds by turning them into a palm oil-like substitute. This prompted her to wonder if her coffee stand could do something with their used grounds besides throwing them away.

Dutch Bros. supported the effort, she said, allowing her to use a company truck for deliveries and store the supplies in a south Salem warehouse.

Each participating stand has a designated member of the Tulip team who ensures baristas do not throw non-compostable waste with the pitch. Roberts picks up used land and makes deliveries twice a week, also stopping at Marion Polk Youth Farm and a local mushroom farm.

“It actually turned into something pretty amazing,” she said.

Ray said the first compost pile on campus is ready to cook and he plans to set up a second for the final deliveries.

He acknowledged that most college deans don’t spend part of their day on a tractor turning compost, but said it was true to its roots.

He grew up on a farm and was previously vocational technical education coordinator at Dallas High School, a position he held after teaching agriculture classes at local high schools for years.

“I would do farming today, but I can’t afford it,” he says. He opted for the next best option: to train future farmers.

“Two noblest things you can do on the planet – feed people or teach people how to feed people,” he said.

Amanda Roberts, a Dutch Bros. barista. and leader of the ‘Tulip Team,’ throws a bag of used coffee grounds onto a compost pile at the Chemeketa Community College Farm Complex on Feb. 10, 2022 (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

Contact journalist Rachel Alexander: [email protected] or 503-575-1241.

JUST THE FACTS, FOR SALE – We report on your community with care and depth, fairness and accuracy. Receive local news that matters to you. Subscribe to Salem Reporter from $5 per month. Click on I want to subscribe!

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Chapel Hill ISD Board Calls for $125M Bond Election for May Election https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/chapel-hill-isd-board-calls-for-125m-bond-election-for-may-election/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 02:59:00 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/chapel-hill-isd-board-calls-for-125m-bond-election-for-may-election/ From Chapel Hill ISD SMITH COUNTY, Texas (Press Release) – On Monday, February 14, 2022, the Chapel Hill Independent School District Board of Trustees voted unanimously to call bail totaling $125,240,000 for the May 7 election, targeting improvements for all campuses. If the bond passes, the current debt service fee of $0.11 would be increased […]]]>

From Chapel Hill ISD

SMITH COUNTY, Texas (Press Release) – On Monday, February 14, 2022, the Chapel Hill Independent School District Board of Trustees voted unanimously to call bail totaling $125,240,000 for the May 7 election, targeting improvements for all campuses.

If the bond passes, the current debt service fee of $0.11 would be increased by $0.3482.

The bond package is comprised of two proposals that include a new junior high campus, a new career and technology education facility, a mixed-use activity center, a new transportation and operations facility and further improvements to the facilities of all existing schools.

Chapel Hill ISD School Board Chairman Les Schminkey said: “It has been 15 years since the community of Chapel Hill voted to adopt a bond. In the fall of 2021, an assessment of our facilities was completed by the Texas Association of School Boards Facilities Services (TASB) and reviewed by the Long-Term Facilities Planning Committee comprised of community members and staff from the district. The committee came up with a facility master plan in December that got us to where we are now, calling it a bond. »

The proposals are part of a list of project recommendations presented by the Long-Range Facilities Planning Committee to the school board in December 2021. The committee of approximately 50 local citizens and staff reviewed an assessment of all facilities of the district that was provided by Texas Association of School Board Facilities Services. The committee recommended safety upgrades and renovations to aging student facilities to accommodate the continued growth of student programs, extracurricular activities, fine arts, athletic programs, and the high school’s new educational model called the Academies. of Chapel Hill.

The outline of the proposal:

new college

Build a new junior high school on its own campus with adequate area, traffic, access and facilities. The maximum capacity is 800 students.

New Operation and Transmission Facility

Build a new operations facility and relocate the following departments to the new facility: transportation, maintenance, infant nutrition, grounds, shipping and receiving, including offices, stores, warehousing, fueling, car wash buses and parking.

New Center for Vocational and Technological Education (CTE)

Build a new CTE facility to replace the current CTE facility, with upgraded classrooms and store spaces for the 13 career programs offered by Chapel Hill ISD.

Renovate office and library, add walkway to Kissam Intermediate

Renovate the current library space to allow construction of an updated campus entrance with improved security features. Build a new and improved driveway for parent pickup with improved circulation. Renovate administrative offices to build a 21st century media library.

Build new classrooms, renovate office and gymnasium at Wise Elementary

Build six new classrooms connected to the main building to improve campus safety and security. Renovate the gymnasium to increase its capacity and improve student toilets and storage. Renovate the school entrance and administrative offices with a secure entrance and a waiting room.

Build new classrooms, renovate gymnasium at Jackson Elementary

Build six new classrooms connected to the main building to improve campus safety and security. Renovate the gymnasium to increase its capacity and improve student toilets and storage.

New multipurpose activity center

Build a multipurpose facility to provide accessibility for district programs to use. The proposed plan would accommodate the continued growth of extracurricular activities, music, drill team, cheer and accommodate over 500 student-athletes including football, softball, baseball, soccer and athleticism.

The district plans to hold its first virtual meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 17 for members of the English-speaking community and at 7:30 p.m. for members of the Spanish-speaking community.

Voters living within the constituency boundaries can vote on two ballots in early voting from April 25 to May 3, or on Election Day, May 7.

On Tuesday, February 15, information will be posted on the district bond website: chapelhillisd.org/2022bond

For more information, contact Belen Casillas, Communications Director of Chapel Hill ISD, at (903) 566-2441.

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Join us at State of the City on February 18 | News, Sports, Jobs https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/join-us-at-state-of-the-city-on-february-18-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 07:33:19 +0000 https://www.sisterfriends-together.org/join-us-at-state-of-the-city-on-february-18-news-sports-jobs/ At the Town of Minot, we are in the midst of final preparations for the annual State of the Town event. The State of the City is scheduled for February 18 at the old Cognizant building located at 2000 21st Avenue NW. The building is now owned by the Minot public school district […]]]>

At the Town of Minot, we are in the midst of final preparations for the annual State of the Town event.

The State of the City is scheduled for February 18 at the old Cognizant building located at 2000 21st Avenue NW. The building is now owned by the Minot public school district and is expected to become the city’s second public high school in the coming years.

The State of the City is open to the public, with my talk scheduled to begin around 12:30 p.m. You can also join us for lunch; the cost for midday lunch is $15. All other parts of the event are free. Lunch tickets are available at www.minotnd.org/RSVPStateoftheCity

I have to thank our partners this year: Minot Area Chamber EDC helped organize much of the event, and the Minot Public School District graciously allowed us to host the event at their future high school site. We appreciate their willingness to participate in the success of the state of the city.

We began organizing the State of the Town five years ago with a simple goal: to provide our community with up-to-date information on the most recent year at the Town of Minot and to anticipate the year ahead. Last year’s online video event looked a little different due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but this year we’re happy to host a live, in-person event again.

Each year, it takes a team effort from our community partners and a number of City employees to make the State of the City a reality. But it’s still worth it. By looking back on the past year and focusing on the year ahead, we are able to remind ourselves of the ongoing challenges we face as a community and the successes we have experienced. And we’ve had a lot of both in 2021.

We’ll talk about that in more detail, of course, in my talk on February 18. But if we take even a moment to reflect on 2021, we will see that it was a year full of good things in our community. Flood control is progressing, including recent news of federal funding approval for the vital maple diversion phase. Voters approved our city’s second public high school. Work continues on the final stages of the North West Region Water Supply Project. Our business community is growing, including several new businesses in downtown Minot. Our intermodal port is busy and continues to expand economic opportunities. A project to renovate a downtown building into a new city hall is underway. Plans are underway to create Minot’s first technical education center. The list is lengthened increasingly.

We know there are many good things happening in our community; we just have to be willing to stop and watch. Of course, there are also challenges, and we cannot and do not want to ignore these issues. Instead, we choose to meet our challenges head-on because we know the decisions we make today will lead to a better Minot in the future.

As part of this year’s State of the City, we will announce the winner of our Citizen of the Year search. Everyone has a story to tell, and Minot is full of people doing amazing things every day. Example: I recently attended Souris Valley United Way’s annual banquet, and the room was full of people giving their time and effort to make Minot a better place to live. Everyone present that day represents the community spirit that makes Minot a unique place to live. There are so many organizations in Minot that depend on volunteers to succeed, and our community rarely, if ever, disappoints. I look forward to announcing Citizen of the Year, but I also know that there are countless residents who could have earned this title. Congratulations to all those who make Minot a great place to live.

We are expecting a big event on February 18, and I encourage you to join us. If you can’t make it to the event, you can watch it on the Town of Minot’s social media platforms, including Facebook and YouTube. It is important that we come together as a community to share not only our challenges, but also our successes and our vision for the year ahead. Please join us on February 18.

Sincerely, City Hall

You can learn more about what’s happening in the town of Minot at minotnd.org, or find us on Facebook and Twitter. We also encourage you to sign up for our monthly e-newsletter on our website.



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